Ahobilam: 2 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Ahobilam means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Images (photo gallery)

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Acta Orientalia vol. 74 (2013): Historical sequence of the Vaiṣṇava Divyadeśas

Ahobilam (Ciṅkavēḷkuṉṟam) refers to one of the 108 Vaishnava Divya Desam (divyadeśas or divyasthalas), located in the topographical division of Vaṭanāṭu (“North India”), according to the 9th century Nālāyirativviyappirapantam (shortly Nālāyiram).—Tradition would record the Vaiṣṇava divyadeśas or divyasthalas are 108. The divyadeśa is a base of the cult of Viṣṇu in Viṣṇuism [Vaiṣṇavism] tradition. The list of 108 [viz., Ahobilam] seems to have reached maturation by about the early 9th century CE as all the deśas are extolled in the hymns of the twelve Āḻvārs.

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

Discover the meaning of ahobilam in the context of Vaishnavism from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Chaitanya’s life and teachings (history)

Ahobilam is one of the places visited by Chaitanya during his pilgrimage in Southern India between April 1510 and January 1512.—Ahobal.—Ahobilam, in the Sirvel taluq of the Karnul district. The most sacred Vishnu temple in the district, it is dedicated to Narasimha. Together with other temples in the neighbourhood, it forms a group known as the Nava (nine) Narasimha, represent ing nine different forms of Vishnu. The original temple is supported by 64 pillars, each of which is beautifully carved into several miniature pillars. In front is a fine unfinished mantapam with large pillars of white sand-stone, about 3 feet in diameter, elaborately sculptured. (Kurnool Manual, 183-184, 145).

Source: Shodhganga: Siddha Cult in Tamilnadu

Ahobilam refers to one of the various famous Siddha Centre distributed throughout South India and Tamil Nadu. The Siddha cult represents a Tantric philosophy that emerged from the combination of several elements found in traditions such as Shaivism (viz., Pashupata), Shaktism, Jainism, Tantric Buddhism (Vajrayana), etc. Both the Siddha and the Navanath cult (i.e., Nava-natha, ‘nine saints’) are popular in South India [viz., Ahobilam] and Tamilnadu. A Siddha was an inspired seer belonging to the marginalized sections of society who dissolved their past karma and crushed the roots of future karma.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of ahobilam in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: