Agasti, aka: Agastī, Āgastī; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Agasti means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

[Agasti in India history glossaries]

Agasti (अगस्ति) is the name of a member of the mahāparṣad (assembly) mentioned in the “Ciñcaṇī plate of the reign of Cittarāja”. Accordingly, “Now, while the Mahāmaṇḍaleśvara, the illustrious Cāmuṇḍarāja, who, by his religious merit, has obtained the right to the five mahāśabdas... is governing Saṃyāna, he addresses all persons, whether connected with himself or others (such as Agasti)...”.

This plate (mentioning Agasti) was found together with eight others at Chincaṇī in the Ḍahāṇu tāluka of the Ṭhāṇā District, North Koṅkaṇ, in 1955. The object of the inscription is to record the grant, by Cāmuṇḍarāja, of a ghāṇaka (oil-mill) in favour of the temple Kautuka-maṭhikā of the goddess Bhagavatī at Saṃyāna. The gift was made by pouring out water on the hand of the Svādhyāyika (scholar) Vīhaḍa, on the fifteenth tithi of the dark fortnight (i.e. amāvāsyā) of Bhādrapada in the śaka year 956.

(Source): What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[Agasti in Marathi glossaries]

agasti (अगस्ति).—m (S) The name of a saint. He is the Regent of the star Canopus. 2 The star Canopus. 3 Applied appellatively to a Glutton or great eater: because the saint agasti swallowed up the ocean. 4 Pop. agastā or styā A tree, Ӕschynomene grandiflora.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Agasti in Sanskrit glossaries]

Agasti (अगस्ति).—[vindhyākhyaṃ agaṃ asyati; as-ktic śakandhvādi°, Uṇ.4. 179, or agaṃ vindhyācalaṃ styāyati stabhnāti, styai-ka; or agaḥ kumbhaḥ tatra styānaḥ saṃhataḥ ityagastyaḥ]

1) 'Pitcher-born,' Name of a celebrated Ṛiṣi or sage.

2) Name of the star Canopus, of which Agastya is the regent.

3) Name of a plant (bakavṛkṣa) Sesbana (or Ӕschynomene) Grandiflora [Mar. रुईमंदार (ruīmaṃdāra)]. [The sage Agastya is a very reputed personage in Hindu mythology. In the Ṛigveda he and Vasiṣṭha are said to be the off-springs of Mitra and Varuṇa, whose seed fell from them at the sight of the lovely nymph Urvaśī at a sacrificial session. Part of the seed fell into a jar and part into water; from the former arose Agastya, who is, therefore, called Kumbhayoni, Kumbhajanman, Ghaṭodbhava, Kalaśayoni &c; from the latter Vasiṣṭha. From his parentage Agastya is also called Maitrāvaruṇi, Aurvaśeya, and, as he was very small when he was born, he is also called Mānya. He is represented to have humbled the Vindhya mountains by making them prostrate themselves before him when they tried to rise higher and higher till they wellnigh occupied the sun's disc and obstructed his path. See Vindhya. (This fable is supposed by some, to typify the progress of the Āryas towards the south in their conquest and civilization of India, the humbling of the mountain standing metaphorically for the removal of physical obstacles in their way). He is also known by the names of Pītābdhi, Samudra-chuluka &c.; from another fable according to which he drank up the ocean because it had offended him and because he wished to help Indra and the gods in their wars with a class of demons called Kāleyas who had hid themselves in the waters and oppressed the three worlds in various ways. His wife was Lopāmudrā. She was also called Kauṣītakī and Varapradā. She bore him two sons, Dṛḍhāsya and Dṛḍhāsyu. In the Rāmāyaṇa Agastya plays a distinguished part. He dwelt in a hermitage on mount Kunjara to the south of the Vindhya and was chief of the hermits of the south. He kept under control the evil spirits who infested the south and a legend relates how he once ate up a Rākṣasa named Vātāpi, who had assumed the form of a ram, and destroyed by a flash of his eye the Rākṣasa's brother who attempted to avenge him. In the course of his wandering Rāma with his wife and brother came to the hermitge of Agastya who received him with the greatest kindness and became his friend, adviser and protector. He gave Rāma the bow of Viṣṇu and accompanied him to Ayodhyā when he was restored to his kingdom after his exile of 14 years. The superhuman power which the sage possessed, is also represented by another legend, according to which he turned king Nahuṣa into a serpent and afterwards restored him to his proper form. In the south he is usually regarded as the first teacher of science and literature to the primitive Dravidian tribes, and his era is placed by Dr. Caldwell in the 7th or 6th century B.C. The Purāṇas represent Agastya as the son of Pulastya (the sage from whom the Rākṣasas sprang) and Havirbhuvā the daughter of Kardama. Several 'hymn-seers' are mentioned in his family, such as his two sons, Indrabāhu, Mayobhuva and Mahendra, also others who served to perpetuate the family. The sage is represented as a great philosopher, benevolent and kind-hearted, unsurpassed in the science of archery and to have taken a principal part in the colonization of the south; निर्जितासि मया भद्रे शत्रुहस्तादमर्षिणा । अगस्त्येन दुराधर्षा मुनिना दक्षिणेव दिक् (nirjitāsi mayā bhadre śatruhastādamarṣiṇā | agastyena durādharṣā muninā dakṣiṇeva dik) || Rām; अगस्त्याचरितामाशाम् (agastyācaritāmāśām) R.4.44; cf. also; अगस्त्यो दक्षिणामाशामाश्रित्य नभसिः स्थितः । वरुणस्यात्मजो योगी विन्ध्यवातापिमर्दनः (agastyo dakṣiṇāmāśāmāśritya nabhasiḥ sthitaḥ | varuṇasyātmajo yogī vindhyavātāpimardanaḥ) || and R.6.61; Mv.7.14.] अगस्तितुल्या हि घृताब्धिशोषणे (agastitulyā hi ghṛtābdhiśoṣaṇe) | Udbhaṭa.

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Agastī (अगस्ती).—A female descendent of Agastya.

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Āgastī (आगस्ती).—[agastyasya iyaṃ, aṇ, yalopaḥ] The south.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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