Agadha, Agādha, Āgādha: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Agadha means something in Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Agadh.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Agādha (अगाध) refers to the “unfathomable” (cycle of rebirth), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Who has not been [your] relative? Which  living beings have not been your enemies, you who is mercilessly immersed in the mud of the miserable and unfathomable cycle of rebirth (duranta-agādhadurantāgādhasaṃsārapaṅkamagnasya)? Here [in the cycle of rebirth] a king becomes an insect and an insect becomes the chief of the gods. An embodied soul might wander about, tricked by [their] karma without being able to help it”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

agādha : (adj.) 1. very deep; 2. supportless.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

agādha (अगाध).—a (S) Bottomless, fathomless, boundless, lit. fig.--water, wisdom, wealth, perfections. 2 In lax phraseology and with neg. con. Difficult or hard to happen; unlikely. Ex. paikēvānāsa pāhijē tī vastū miḷavāyāsa a0 nāhīṃ hō.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

agādha (अगाध).—a Bottomless, fathomless, bound- less.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Agādha (अगाध).—a. [gādh-pratiṣṭhāyāṃ ghañ; na. ba.] Unfathomable, very deep, bottomless; अगाधसलिलात्समुद्रात् (agādhasalilātsamudrāt) H.1.52; (fig.) profound, sound, very deep यस्य ज्ञानदयासिन्धोरगाधस्यानघा गुणाः (yasya jñānadayāsindhoragādhasyānaghā guṇāḥ) Ak. unfathomable, incomprehensible, inscrutable, Not learned; अगाधाश्चाप्रतिष्ठाश्च गतिमन्तश्च नारद (agādhāścāpratiṣṭhāśca gatimantaśca nārada) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 12. 286.7. Not established, well-known; अगाधजन्मामरणं च राजन् (agādhajanmāmaraṇaṃ ca rājan) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 12.38.39.

-dhaḥ-dham a deep hole or chasm.

-dhaḥ Name of one of the 5 fires at the स्वाहाकार (svāhākāra) [cf. Gr. agathos].

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Āgādha (आगाध).—a. [āgādha eva svārthe aṇ]

1) Very deep or unfathomable (fig. also).

2) Difficult to obtain.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Agādha (अगाध).—n.

(-dhaḥ) A hole, a chasm. mfn.

(-dhaḥ-dhā-dhaṃ) Very deep, bottomless. E. a neg. gādha fixed place.

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Āgādha (आगाध).—mfn.

(-dhaḥ-dhā-dhaṃ) Very deep: see agādha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Agādha (अगाध).—adj., 1. bottomless, [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 74, 17. 2. unfathomable, Mahābhārata 5, 897.

Agādha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms a and gādha (गाध).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Agādha (अगाध).—[adjective] bottomless, deep; sattva [adjective] of an unfathomable character.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Agādha (अगाध):—[=a-gādha] mf(ā)n. not shallow, deep, unfathomable

2) [v.s. ...] m. a hole, chasm, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of one of the five fires at the Svadhākāra, [Harivaṃśa]

4) Āgādha (आगाध):—[=ā-gādha] mfn. ‘a little deep’ = agādha q.v., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Agādha (अगाध):—[bahuvrihi compound] I. m. f. n.

(-dhaḥ-dhā-dham) Bottomless, very deep. Ii. 1. m. n.

(-dhaḥ-dham) A hole, a chasm. 2. m.

(-dhaḥ) The name of one of the five fires at the Svāhākāra. E. a priv. and gādha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Agādha (अगाध):—[a-gādha] (dhaṃ) 1. n. A hole; a. Bottomless; very deep.

2) Āgādha (आगाध):—[ā-gādha] (dhaḥ-dhā-dhaṃ) a. Very deep.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Agādha (अगाध) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Agāḍha, Agāha, Aggāha, Āgāḍha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Agadha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Agādha (अगाध) [Also spelled agadh]:—(a) unfathomable; profound, deep;—[jala] deep/unfathomable water; hence ~[] (nf).

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Agāḍha (अगाढ) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Agādha.

2) Āgāḍha (आगाढ) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Āgāḍha.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Agādha (ಅಗಾಧ):—

1) [adjective] that cannot be fathomed; very deep; unfathomable.

2) [adjective] (fig.) that cannot be achieved or accomplished; impossible.

3) [adjective] characterised by erudition, hugeness or enormity; profuse; profound; excessive.

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Agādha (ಅಗಾಧ):—[noun] a deep cleft or fissure in the earth; a chasm.

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Āgādha (ಆಗಾಧ):—[noun] (dial.) that which is formidable; that which cannot be overcome.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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