Acinta, Acimta: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Acinta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Achinta.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Vajrayana

Acinta is the name of a mahāsiddha, of which eighty-four in total are recognized in Vajrayāna (tantric buddhism). His title is “the avaricious hermit”. He lived somewhere between the 8th and the 12th century AD.

These mahāsiddhas (e.g., Acinta) are defined according to the Abhayadatta Sri (possibly Abhayākaragupta) tradition. Its textual origin traces to the 11th century caturāsiti-siddha-pravṛtti, or “the lives of the eighty-four siddhas”, of which only Tibetan translations remains. Acinta (and other Mahāsiddhas) are the ancient propounders of the textual tradition of tantric or Vajrayana Buddhism.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: The Geographical Dictionary of Ancient and Mediaeval India

Acinta or Achinta.—Ajanta, about fifty-five miles to tho north-east of Ellora in Centrol India. In the Acinta monastery resided Ārya Saṅga (perhaps Asaṅga), tho founder of the Yogācārya school of the Buddhists (S. C. Das’s Indian Pundits tn the Land of Snow). It is celebrated for its caves and vihāras, which belong to the fifth and sixth centuries of the Christian era. An inscription there shows that the caves were caused to be excavated by a Sthavira named Acala.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Acinta (अचिन्त).—mfn.

(-ntaḥ-ntā-ntaṃ) Insensible, inanimate. E. a neg. cintā reflexion.

--- OR ---

Acintā (अचिन्ता).—f.

(-ntā) Disregard, absence of thought or consideration. E. a neg. cintā thought.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Acintā (अचिन्ता).—[feminine] thoughtlessness, disregard.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Acintā (अचिन्ता):—[=a-cintā] f. thoughtlessness.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Acintā (अचिन्ता):—[tatpurusha compound] f.

(-ntā) 1) Absence of thought or conside-ration.

2) Disregard. E. a neg. and cintā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Acinta (अचिन्त):—[a-cinta] (ntaḥ-ntā-ntaṃ) a. Insensible.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Acinta (अचिन्त) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Aciṃta.

[Sanskrit to German]

Acinta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Aciṃta (अचिंत) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Acinta.

2) Aciṃta (अचिंत) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Acintya.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Aciṃta (ಅಚಿಂತ):—[noun] a man who is free from worry or botheration.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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