Acidrupa, Acidrūpa, Acit-rupa: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Acidrupa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Achidrupa.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Acidrupa in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Acidrūpa (अचिद्रूप) refers to “insentient”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.25. Accordingly as Rāma narrated to Satī:—“[...] then the delighted Lord Śiva, favourably disposed towards his devotees, bestowed great boons on Viṣṇu and the other Devas. Lord Śiva said:—‘[...] Accept this Māyā too which cannot be withstood by Devas and others and by which the entire universe will be deluded and made insentient as it were (acidrūpa). [...]’”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Acidrūpa (अचिद्रूप) refers to “(a person whose habitual) nature is unconscious”, according to the Īśvarapratyabhijñākārikā 3.2.11.—Accordingly, “And this Awareness-principle, consisting of [unlimited] Agency (kartṛtā-maya), [becomes] limited—[though] it is strengthened by partial agency—abiding as a [mere] attribute in a person whose [habitual] nature is unconscious (acidrūpa), [identifying as he does with] the void, [prāṇa, mind,] and [body].”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Acidrūpa (अचिद्रूप) refers to the “forms of matter”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “In reality, there is no unity of the forms of matter and consciousness (acidrūpaaciccidrūpayor) with regard to mundane bondage and the connection of these two is without a beginning like gold and a flaw in gold. In this world, the body which is material, absolutely immobile [and] without that which is conscious, becomes confused, through ignorance, with that which is conscious, formless and mobile”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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