Abharanabhushita, Ābharaṇabhūṣita, Abharana-bhushita: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Abharanabhushita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Ābharaṇabhūṣita can be transliterated into English as Abharanabhusita or Abharanabhushita, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

[«previous next»] — Abharanabhushita in Pancaratra glossary
Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Ābharaṇabhūṣita (आभरणभूषित) refers to “(being) adorned with ornaments”, according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “One desirous of a kingdom, one who has been deprived of it or one conquered by [other] rulers, after having paid respect with large masses of wealth to the supreme Guru, the giver of Sudarśana’s Yantra, considering [him] superior to all, should propitiate God Nārāyaṇa—who has large eyes like lotuses, is [of] dark [complexion], clad in a yellow garment, adorned with all ornaments (sarva-ābharaṇabhūṣita) and with four arms—following the rules given by the teacher. [...]”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

Discover the meaning of abharanabhushita or abharanabhusita in the context of Pancaratra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Abharanabhushita in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Ābharaṇabhūṣitā (आभरणभूषिता) refers to “being adorned with many ornaments”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 11.1-24ab, while describing the appearance and worship of Tumburu]—“[...] The Devīs are white, red, yellow, and black, four-faced, four armed, three eyed, and in [their] hands bear golden hatchets, sticks and rosaries. [...] Seated on horseback, the Great Devī [Aparājitā] is adorned with many ornaments (sarva-ābharaṇabhūṣitā) and resembles a broken sapphire [i.e., black]. [She is] adorned with four faces, four arms, three eyes, and holds a grass noose, a jewel, a bowl, and a mace. [She] stands firmly on a divine seat, clothed in gold clothes and gold ornaments. [...] [When one] worships and meditates on [the Devīs, as they] stand in the cardinal directions, [the Devīs grant the practitioner] the fruits of siddhi. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of abharanabhushita or abharanabhusita in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

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