22 Phenomenological Faculties: 1 definition

Introduction

22 Phenomenological Faculties means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

[(2) next»] — 22 Phenomenological Faculties in Buddhism glossary
Source: WikiPedia: Buddhism

In the Abhidhamma Pitaka, the notion of indriya is expanded to the twenty two “phenomenological faculties” or “controlling powers” (Pali: bavisati indriyani) which are:

Six sensory faculties:

  1. eye/vision faculty (cakkh undriya)
  2. ear/hearing faculty (sot indriya)
  3. nose/smell faculty (ghan indriya)
  4. tongue/taste faculty (jivh indriya)
  5. body/sensibility faculty (kay indriya)
  6. mind faculty (man indriya)

Three physical faculties:

  1. femininity (itth indriya)
  2. masculinity (puris indriya)
  3. life or vitality (jivit indriya)

Five feeling faculties:

  1. physical pleasure (sukh indriya)
  2. physical pain (dukkh indriya)
  3. mental joy (somanasa indriya)
  4. mental grief (domanass indriya)
  5. indifference (upekh indriya)

Five spiritual faculties:

  1. faith (saddh indriya)
  2. energy (viriy indriya)
  3. mindfulness (sat indriya)
  4. concentration (samadhi indriya)
  5. wisdom (pann indriya)

Three final knowledge faculties:

  1. thinking “I shall know the unknown” (anannata nassamit indriya)
  2. gnosis (ann indriya)
  3. one who knows (annata vindriya)

According to the post canonical Visuddhimagga, the 22 faculties along with such constructs as the aggregates, sense bases, Four Noble Truths and Dependent Origination are the “soil” of wisdom (panna).

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