Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

Upāli-Pentads (Division 14: the Formal Making of Kaṭhina Cloth)

Prv.17.14.1 “How many advantages are there, revered sir, in formally making kaṭhina cloth?”

“There are these five advantages, Upāli, in formally making kaṭhina cloth. What five? Going (to families for alms) without having asked for permission, walking (for alms) not taking the three robes, a group-meal, as much robe-material as is required, and whatever robe-material accrues there, that will be for them.[1] These, Upāli, are the five advantages in formally making the kaṭhina cloth.”

Prv.17.14.2 “How many perils are there, revered sir, for one of muddled mindfulness, not clearly conscious, when he has fallen asleep?”

“There are these five perils, Upāli, for one of muddled mindfulness … when he has fallen asleep. What five? He sleeps uneasily, he wakes uneasily, he sees an evil dream, devatās do not guard him, impurity is emitted.[2] These are the five perils … when he has fallen asleep.

“There are these five advantages, Upāli, for one of raised up mindfulness, who is clearly conscious, when he has fallen asleep. What five? He sleeps easily, he wakes easily, he does not see an evil dream, devatās guard him, impurity is not emitted. These are the five advantages … when he has fallen asleep.”

Prv.17.14.3 “How many, revered sir, are not to be greeted?”

“These five, Upāli, are not to be greeted.[3] Which five? One who has entered amid the houses is not to be greeted, one who is on a carriage-road is not to be greeted, one who is in the (partial) darkness[4] is not to be greeted, one who is not considering[5] (his duties) is not to be greeted, one who is asleep is not to be greeted. These five, Upāli, are not to be greeted.

Prv.17.14.4 “And a further five, Upāli, are not to be greeted. Which five? One who is drinking conjey is not to be greeted, one in a BD.6.330 refectory … one who has turned away alone[6] … one who is thinking about something else[7] … one who is naked is not t be greeted. These five, Upāli, are not to be greeted.

Prv.17.14.5 “And a further five, Upāli, are not to be greeted. Which five? One who is eating solid food is not to be greeted, one who is eating soft food … one who is defecating … one who is urinating … one who is suspended[8] is not to be greeted. These five, Upāli, are not to be greeted.

Prv.17.14.6 “And a further five, Upāli, are not to be greeted. Which five? One ordained later is not to be greeted by one ordained earlier,[9] one not ordained is not to be greeted, one belonging to a different communion (even) if he is more senior (yet) is a speaker of non-dhamma is not to be greeted, a woman is not to be greeted a eunuch is not to be greeted. These five, Upāli, are not to be greeted.

Prv.17.14.7 “And a further five, Upāli, are not to be greeted. Which five? One under probation[10] is not to be greeted, one who deserves to be sent back to the beginning[11] … one who deserves mānatta … one undergoing mānatta … one who deserves rehabilitation is not to be greeted. These five, Upāli, are not to be greeted.”

Prv.17.14.8 Vin.5.206 “How many, revered sir, are to be greeted?”

““These five, Upāli, are to be greeted. Which five?[12] One ordained earlier is to be greeted by one ordained later, one belonging to a different communion if he is more senior and is a speaker of Dhamma is to be greeted, a teacher is to be greeted,[13] a preceptor is to be greeted, a Tathāgata, arahant, perfect Buddha is to be greeted by the world with its devas, with its Māras, with its Brahmās, by creatures with recluses and brahmins, with devas and mankind. These five, Upāli, are to be greeted.”

Prv.17.14.9 “If a more newly ordained monk, revered sir, is honouring[14] BD.6.331 the feet of a more senior monk, when he has caused how many states to be set up within himself should he honour the feet?”

“If a more newly ordained monk, Upāli, is honouring the feet of a more senior monk, having caused five states to be set up within himself he should honour the feet. What five? When a more newly ordained monk, Upāli, is honouring the feet of a more senior monk, having arranged his outer cloak over one shoulder, holding out his joined palms in salutation, stroking his feet on all sides with the palms of his hands, having caused regard and esteem to be set up, he should honour his feet. When a more newly ordained monk, Upāli, is honouring the feet of a more senior monk, having caused these five states to be set up within himself, he should honour his feet.”

Concluded is the Fourteenth Division: on the Formal Making of Kaṭhina Cloth

Its Summary

Formal making of kaṭhina cloth,
and asleep, amid, conjey, when eating,
And earlier, and one under probation,
one to be greeted, one who should honour.

Concluded are the Upāli-Pentads

The summary of these Divisions:

Independently, and (formal) act,
remain, and as to an explanation,
And reproof, and ascetic practices,
lying, and to a nun also, /
Referendum, legal question, schismatics,
the fifth in the preceding,[15]
Resident (monks), and kaṭhina cloth:
the fourteen are well proclaimed. /

Footnotes and references:

1.

As at Vin.1.154 where these are called five things that are allowable.

2.

As at Vin.1.295.

3.

See Prv.7.10.1 above (towards end at item 37) and Prv.7.11.1 (towards middle at item 15) where ten individuals and eleven individuals are not to be greeted.

4.

otamasika, not in Pali-English Dictionary. No other canonical reference given by P.T.C. Vin-a.1379 explains by andhakāragato, and adds that in greeting him the forehead might be hurt by the legs of a couch.

5.

kiccayapasutattā vandanaṃ asamannāharanto, not attending to, not reacting to the greeting because he is not performing his obligations.

6.

ekāvatta: to a rival faction. Greeting him, one might get kicked, Vin-a.1379.

7.

aññāvihita, as at Vin.4.69, Vin.4.97, Vin.4.269.

8.

“Suspended by the threefold formal act of suspension. Those against whom the other four formal acts have been carried out may be greeted. There is an offence in greeting one who is naked (see Kd.15.15) and one who is suspended,” Vin-a.1379.

9.

This pentad and the next occur at Kd.16.6.5.

10.

see Kd.12.1.2.

11.

See Kd.13.15.

12.

The first, second and fifth are given at Kd.16.6.5.

13.

Vin-a.1379 says these five teachers are to be greeted: the teacher forgoing forth, for ordination, for guidance, for the recitation, and for exhortation.

14.

Same Pali word as for “greeting”.

15.

bhedakā pañcamā pure, referring no doubt to the two sections (Prv.17.11, Prv.17.12) on a schismatic where the fifth clauses of each pentad are opposed to one another. Oldenberg gives no comma after bhedakā and thus accounts for 13 Divisions only.

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