Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

Upāli-Pentads (Division 7: Lying Speech)

Prv.17.7.1 “How many (kinds of) lying speech are there, revered sir?”

“There are these five (kinds of) lying speech, Upāli. What five? There is the lying speech leading to an offence involving Defeat,[1] there is the lying speech leading to an offence requiring a Formal Meeting of the Order,[2] there is the lying speech leading to a grave offence,[3] there is the lying speech leading to Expiation,[4] there is the lying speech leading to an offence of wrong-doing.[5] These, Upāli, are the five (kinds of) lying speech.”

Prv.17.7.2 “If a monk is possessed of how many qualities,[6] revered sir, and has suspended an Observance or Invitation in the midst of an Order, (but if other monks) have snubbed him, saying ‘That’s enough, monk, let there be no strife, no quarrel, no dispute, no contention’, may Observance or Invitation be carried out by the Order?”

“If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli … may be carried out by the Order. Of what five? If he is unconscientious, and is ignorant, and not a regular monk, if he speaks intent on quitting, if he is not intent on rising from (an offence).[7]

BD.6.312 If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, … may be carried out by the Order.

Prv.17.7.3 And if he is possessed of five further qualities, Upāli be carried out by the Order. Of what five? If he is not pure in bodily conduct, Vin.5.194 is not quite pure in verbal conduct is not quite pure in mode of livelihood, is ignorant and inexperienced, is a maker of strife, a maker of quarrels. If monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, … may be carried out by the Order.”

Prv.17.7.4 “If a monk is possessed of how many qualities, revered sir should he not pass an examination?”

“If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, he should not pass an examination. Of what five? If he does not know what is and what is not an offence, does not know what is a slight and what a serious offence, does not know what is an offence that can be done away with and one that cannot be done away with, does not know what is a very bad offence and what is not, does not know what is an offence for which amends are made and one for which amends are not made. If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, he should not pass an examination.

If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, he may pass an examination. Of what five? If he knows what is and what is not an offence … If a monk … he may pass an examination.”

Prv.17.7.5 “For how many reasons, revered sir, does a monk fall into an offence?”

“For five reasons, Upāli, a monk falls into an offence. For what five? From lack of conscientiousness, from ignorance, from ordinary bad conduct, from (thinking) something is allowable when it is not allowable, from thinking (something) is not allowable when it is allowable.[8] For these five reasons, Upāli, a monk falls into an offence.

Prv.17.7.6 And for five further reasons, Upāli, a monk falls into an BD.6.313 offence. For what five? From not seeing,[9] from not hearing,[10] from being sleepy,[11] from thinking that it is so,[12] from confused mindfulness.[13] For these five reasons, Upāli, a monk falls into an offence.”

Prv.17.7.7 “How many dread (things)[14] are there, revered sir?”

“There are these five dread (things), Upāli. What five? Onslaught on creatures, taking what has not been given, going wrongly amid sense-pleasures, lying speech, occasions of sloth (through drinking) fermented liquor, spirits and strong drink. These, Upāli, are the five dread (things).”

Prv.17.7.8 “How many abstentions are there, revered sir?”

“There are these five abstentions,[15]Upāli. What five? Abstention from onslaught on creatures, abstention from taking what has not been given, abstention from going wrongly amid sense-pleasures, abstention from lying speech, abstention from occasions of sloth (from drinking) fermented liquor, spirits and strong drink. These, Upāli, are the five abstentions.”

Prv.17.7.9 “How many losses are there, revered sir?”

“There are these five losses,[16] Upāli. What five? Loss of relations, loss of possessions, loss by illness, loss in moral habit, loss in (right) view. These, Upāli, are the five losses.”

Prv.17.7.10 “How many prosperities are there, revered sir?”

“There are these five prosperities, Upāli. What five? Prosperity in relations … possessions … health … moral habit, prosperity in (right) view. These, Upāli, are the five prosperities.”

The Seventh Division: on Lying Speech

Its Summary

Vin.5.195 Lying speech, and he snubbed,
of a further, and an examination,
BD.6.314 And an offence, of a further,
dreads, and abstentions too,
Loss, and prosperity as well:
the Compendium of the Seventh Division.

Footnotes and references:

1.

Bu-Pj.4. “Five offences due to lying speech” are included in the Pentads (towards the beginning), see Vin.5.128.

6.

Cf. Vin.5.122.

7.

For this pentad see Vin.5.189.

8.

On these two last clauses Vin-a.1375f. says that if a scruple has arisen (in him) and he sees a monk who is expert in Discipline and questions him the nature of what is and what is not allowable, then, getting rid of what is not allowable he should do what is allowable.

9.

Not seeing an expert on Discipline he falls into an offence he would not have fallen into had he seen one.

10.

If he goes to an expert on Discipline to attend to his needs and fails to ask him what is and what is not allowable, he falls into an offence from “not hearing”.

11.

pasuttakatā.

12.

tathāsaññī, falling through thinking it is allowable when it is not.

13.

Such as letting one night too many pass by.

14.

Cf. AN.iii.204, SN.ii.68. Vera is twofold: akusala- and puggala-vera.

15.

Cf. Nuns’ Bi-Pc.63 where a sixth abstention is given.

16.

See Vin.5.129.