Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

Upāli-Pentads (Division 5: Undertaking on one’s own Behalf)

Prv.17.5.1 “When a monk is reproving, revered sir, and wishes to reprove another, having considered how many states within himself may he reprove the other[1]?”

“When a monk is reproving, Upāli, and wishes to reprove another, having considered five states within himself may he reprove the other. What five? Upāli, when a monk is reproving and wishes to reprove another, he should consider thus: ‘Now, am I quite pure in bodily conduct … as at Kd.19.5.1 … When a monk is reproving, Upāli, and wishes to reprove another, having considered these five states within himself he may reprove the other.”

Prv.17.5.2 BD.6.307 “When a monk is reproving, revered sir, and wishes to reprove another, having set up how many states within himself may he reprove the other?”

“When a monk is reproving, Upāli, and wishes to reprove another, having set up five states within himself may he reprove the other. What five? ‘I will speak at a right time … as at Kd.19.5.2 …’ When a monk is reproving, Upāli, and wishes to reprove another, having set up these five states within himself he may reprove the other.”

Prv.17.5.3 “When a monk is reproving, revered sir, and wishes to reprove another, having attended to how many states within himself may he reprove the other?”

“When a monk is reproving, Upāli, and wishes to reprove another, having attended to five states within himself may he reprove the other.[2] What five? Compassion, seeking welfare, sympathy, removal of offences, aiming at Discipline.[3] When a monk is reproving, Upāli, and wishes to reprove another, having attended to these five states within himself he may reprove the other.”

Prv.17.5.4 “Possessed of how many qualities, revered sir, is it insufficient to give leave to a monk who is obtaining leave?”

“If he is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, it is insufficient to give leave to a monk who is obtaining leave. Of what five? If he is not quite pure in bodily conduct,[4] if he is not quite pure in verbal conduct, if he is not quite pure in mode of livelihood, if he is ignorant and inexperienced, if when being examined he is not competent to pass the examination. Vin.5.191 These, Upāli, are the five qualities possessed of which it is insufficient to give leave to a monk who is obtaining leave.

If he is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, it is sufficient to give leave to a monk who is obtaining leave. Of what five? If he is quite pure in bodily conduct[5] … in verbal conduct … in mode of livelihood, if he is clever and experienced, if when being examined he is competent to pass the examination. If he is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, it is sufficient to give leave to a monk who is obtaining leave.”

Prv.17.5.5 BD.6.308 “Revered sir, if a monk wishes to undertake an undertaking on his own behalf[6] of how many qualities should the undertaking that he undertakes on his own behalf be possessed?”

“Upāli, if a monk wishes to undertake an undertaking on his own behalf, the undertaking that he undertakes on his own behalf must be possessed of five qualities. What five? Upāli if a monk wishes to undertake an undertaking on his own behalf he must consider thus: … as at Kd.19.4 … Thus, Upāli if an undertaking on one’s own behalf is undertaken when it is possessed of these five qualities, later it will be no cause for remorse.”

Prv.17.5.6 “If a monk is possessed of how many qualities, revered sir is he of great service to monks who are engaged in legal questions?”

“When a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, he is of great service to monks who are engaged in legal questions. Of what five? He is moral, he lives controlled by the control of the Pātimokkha, he is possessed of (right) behaviour and resort, he is one seeing danger in the slightest faults, (and) undertaking them he trains in the rules of training.[7] He is one who has heard much, who remembers what he has heard, (and) those things which are lovely in the beginning, lovely in the middle, lovely at the ending which, with the spirit and the letter, declare the Brahma-faring wholly fulfilled, perfectly purified, such things are much heard by him, borne in mind, familiarized by speech, pondered over in the mind, well penetrated by (right) view.[8] Both the Pātimokkhas are properly handed down to him in detail, properly sectioned, properly regulated, properly investigated clause by clause and in respect of the linguistic form.[9] He comes to be firm in Discipline, immovable.[10] He is competent in convincing both of those who are hostile about a matter, in winning them over, in making them consider, in understanding, in reconciling them.[11] BD.6.309 Upāli, if a monk is possessed of these five qualities he is of great service to monks who are engaged in legal questions.

Prv.17.5.7 And, Upāli, if a monk is possessed of five qualities he is of great service to monks who are engaged in legal questions. Of what five? If he is quite pure in bodily conduct … in verbal conduct … in mode of livelihood, if he is clever and experienced, if when being examined he is competent to pass the examination. If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, he is of great service to monks who are engaged in legal questions.

Prv.17.5.8 And, Upāli, if a monk is possessed of five further qualities he is of great service to monks who are engaged in legal questions. Of what five? If he knows the matter, knows the source, knows the laying down, Vin.5.192 knows the order of the words (in a sentence), knows the sequence of the connecting words. If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, he is of great service to monks who are engaged in legal questions.”

Prv.17.5.9 Prv.17.5.10 “Revered sir, if a monk is possessed of how many qualities should he not be examined?”

“If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, he should not be examined. Of what five? If he does not know the clauses, does not know what is in conformity with the clauses, does not know Vinaya, does not know what is in conformity with Vinaya, if he is not skilled in what is and what is not causal occasion.[12] If a monk … see Prv.17.3.10, Prv.17.3.11; for might speak, should not speak in an Order read could be examined, should not be examined … and if he is skilled in what precedes and what follows. If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, he could be examined.

Prv.17.5.11 And if a monk is possessed of five further qualities, Upāli, he should not be examined. Of what five? If he does not know the matter … the source … the laying down … the order of the words (in a sentence), if he does not know the sequence of the connecting words. If he is possessed of these five …

If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, he may be examined. Of what five? If he knows the matter … If a BD.6.310 monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, he may be examined.

Prv.17.5.12 And if a monk is possessed of five further qualities, Upāli, he should not be examined. Of what five? If he does know an offence, does not know the origin of an offence does not know the means (used) for an offence, does not know the removal of an offence, is not skilled in discriminating an offence If a monk is possessed of these five …

If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, he may be examined. Of what five? If he knows an offence … is skilled in discriminating an offence. If a monk is possessed of these five …

Prv.17.5.13 And if a monk is possessed of five further qualities, Upāli, he should not be examined. Of what five? If he does not know a legal question, does not know the origin of a legal question, does not know the means (used) for a legal question, does not know the removal of a legal question, is not skilled in discriminating a legal question. If a monk is possessed of these five …

If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, he may be examined. Of what five? If he knows a legal question … is skilled in discriminating a legal question. If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, he may be examined.”

The Fifth Division: on Undertaking on one’s own Behalf

Its Summary

And quite pure, at a right time,
compassion, and about leave,
One’s own behalf, legal question,
and further, and the matter,
The clauses, Dhamma, and matter again,
offence, and about a legal question.

Footnotes and references:

1.

See Kd.19.5.1.

2.

Referred to at Vin-a.589.

3.

See Kd.19.5.7.

4.

For this sequence, in other contexts, see Kd.4.16.5–7.

5.

See Kd.4.16.10.

6.

As at Kd.19.4. Referred to at Vin-a.589.

7.

Stock, as at Vin.2.95, Vin.4.51; MN.i.355.

8.

Stock, as at Vin.2.95, Vin.4.51; MN.i.356.

9.

As at Vin.2.95, etc. Cf. Vin.5.131.

10.

As at Vin.2.96, there reading cheko, clever, for ṭhito, firm, steadfast as above.

11.

As at Vin.2.96.

12.

As above, Vin.5.186.

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