Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

As To Graduation (7. Septets)

  1. Prv.7.7.1 Seven offences.[1]
  2. Seven classes of offence.[2]
  3. Seven matters that are trained in.[3]
  4. Seven “proper courses”.[4]
  5. Seven carryings out on the acknowledgement of are not legally valid.[5]
  6. Seven carryings out on the acknowledgement of are legally valid.[6]
  7. There is no offence in going to seven (classes of people) if the business can be done in seven days.[7]
  8. Seven advantages for the expert in Discipline.[8]
  9. Seven “at mosts”.[9] Vin.5.135
  10. It is to be BD.6.218 forfeited at sunrise on the seventh day.[10]
  11. Seven decidings.[11]
  12. Seven (formal) acts.[12]
  13. Seven raw grains.[13]
  14. In breadth seven inside.[14]
  15. Seven supplementary layings down for a group-meal.[15]
  16. After one has accepted medicines they may be used as a store for at most seven days.[16]
  17. Taking a robe that has been made up he goes away.[17]
  18. Taking with him a robe that has been made up he goes away.[18]
  19. There is not an offence of a monk’s that should be seen.[19]
  20. There is an offence of a monk’s that should be seen.[20]
  21. There is an offence of a monk’s for which amends should be made.[21]
  22. Seven suspensions of the Pātimokkha are not legally valid.[22]
  23. Seven suspensions of the Pātimokkha are legally valid.[23]
  24. A monk who is possessed of seven qualities is an expert on Discipline: if he knows what is an offence, if he knows what is not an offence; if he knows what is a slight offence, if he knows what is a serious offence; if, possessed of moral habit,[24] he lives controlled by the control of the Pātimokkha; if, possessed of right conduct and resort, seeing danger in the slightest faults, he, undertaking them, trains himself in the rules of training; if he is one who acquires at will, without trouble, without difficulty, the four meditations that are of the purest mentality—abidings in ease here and now; and if, by the destruction of the cankers, he, having realized here and now by his own super-knowledge the freedom of mind and the freedom through wisdom that are cankerless, enters and abides therein.
  25. And if a monk is possessed of seven further qualities he is an expert on Discipline: if he knows what is an offence … if he knows what is a serious offence; if he is one who has heard much, remembers what he has heard, stores up what he has heard—those things, lovely in the beginning, lovely in the middle, lovely at the ending which, with the meaning and the BD.6.219 spirit declare the Brahma-faring wholly fulfilled, perfectly purified, such things are much heard by him, borne in mind, familiarized by speech, pondered over in the mind, and are well penetrated by right view[25]; if he is one who acquires at will … enters and abides therein.
  26. And if a monk is possessed of seven further qualities he is an expert on Discipline: … if he knows what is a serious offence; if the two Pātimokkhas have been properly handed down to him in detail, properly sectioned, properly regulated, properly investigated clause by clause and in respect of the linguistic form; if he is one who acquires at will … enters and abides therein.
  27. And if a monk is possessed of seven further qualities he is an expert on Discipline: if he knows … what is a serious offence; if he recollects a variety of former habitations, that is to say one birth and two births …[26] … thus he recollects a variety of former habitations in all their modes and in detail; if with deva-like vision surpassing that of men, he sees beings as they are passing hence …[27] … thus with the deva-like vision surpassing that of men does he see beings as they are passing hence and coming to be—mean, excellent, fair, foul, and he comprehends that beings are in a good bourn, in a bad bourn according to kamma; and if, by the destruction of the cankers … he enters and abides therein.
  28. And if a monk is possessed of seven further qualities … Vin.5.136 he shines as an expert on Discipline … here and following read he shines as an expert on Discipline instead of he is an expert on Discipline, and repeat the foregoing paragraphs exactly … abides therein.
  29. Seven bad conditions: if one is lacking in faith, is without conscience, is without shame, is one who has heard little, is lazy, is of muddled mindfulness, and is one weak in wisdom.[28]
  30. Seven right conditions: if one has faith, is conscientious, is scrupulous, is one who has heard much, is one whose energy is stirred up, is one whose mindfulness is raised up, and is one full of wisdom.[29]
  31. Concluded are the Septets

    BD.6.220 Its summary:

    Offence, classes of offence, trained in, and “proper courses” too,
    Not legally valid, and legally valid, and no offence if within seven days, /
    Advantages, “at mosts,” sunrise, and about deciding,
    (Formal) acts, and raw grains, inside, for a group-meal, /
    For at most seven days, taking, and similarly taking with him,
    There is not, there is, and there is, not legally valid, and legally valid, /
    Four experts[30] on Discipline, and four shining monks,[31]
    And seven wrong conditions too, seven right conditions are taught.

Footnotes and references:

1.

At Vin.5.117 these two items appear to form the two members of one dyad. Why do they not here, nor “five offences, five classes of offence” do likewise? See also Vin.5.91.

2.

At Vin.5.117 these two items appear to form the two members of one dyad. Why do they not here, nor “five offences, five classes of offence” do likewise? See also Vin.5.91.

3.

See Vin.5.91.

4.

Add Nuns’ Bi-Ss.13 to the six given at Vin.5.133.

7.

In Kd.3.7.

8.

To those enumerated in the Pentads add “the Observance and the invitation are deposited in him”, Vin-a.1341.

9.

The commentator has not decided which of the examples he enumerates at Vin-a.1340 are to be taken up here. See above, BD.6.215, n.3.

12.

Commentary is silent. Perhaps here one should take the formal acts for not seeing an offence and for not acknowledging one as two formal acts, and combine them as in the Sextets.

19.

According to Vin-a.1341 these are three septets and occur in the Campeyyakakkhandhaka, i.e. Kd.8.5.

20.

According to Vin-a.1341 these are three septets and occur in the Campeyyakakkhandhaka, i.e. Kd.8.5

21.

According to Vin-a.1341 these are three septets and occur in the Campeyyakakkhandhaka, i.e. Kd.8.5

24.

For this and the three following qualities, Cf. e.g. MN.v..

25.

Cf. Vin.2.95, Vin.2.249, MN.i.356.

28.

Five of these items are at Kd.1.36.6. For the seven see AN.iv.145.

29.

Five of these are given at Kd.1.36.7. The seven are at DN.iii.252, DN.iii.282, AN.iv.145, Vb.349.

30.

Meaning four groups each, of experts and of shining monks, each with seven qualities.

31.

Meaning four groups each, of experts and of shining monks, each with seven qualities.

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: