Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

Monks’ Analysis: on How Many Offences? (Pācittiya)

Division 1: on Lying

Monks’ Pācittiya 1

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.1 Telling a conscious lie how many offences does he fall into? Telling a conscious lie he falls into five offences: if, having evil desires, evil longings, he lays claim to a non-existent, non-actual state of further-men he falls into an offence involving Defeat; BD.6.56 if he defames a monk with an unfounded charge of an offence involving Defeat there is an offence requiring a Formal Meeting of the Order; if he says, “The monk who lives in this vihāra is an arahant,” he falls into a grave offence for acknowledging (the conscious lie), into an offence of wrong-doing for not acknowledging it; there is an offence of Expiation in conscious lying.[1] Telling a conscious lie he falls into these five offences.

Monks’ Pācittiya 2

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.2 Insulting he falls into two offences: if he insults one who is ordained there is an offence of Expiation;[2] if he insults one who is not ordained there is an offence of wrong-doing.[3]

Monks’ Pācittiya 3

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.3 Bringing slander he falls into two offences: if he brings slander against one who is ordained there is an offence of Expiation; if he brings slander against one who is not ordained[4] there is an offence of wrong-doing.[5]

Monks’ Pācittiya 4

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.4 Making one who is not ordained speak Dhamma line by line he falls into two offences: if he makes him speak there is an offence of wrong-doing in (the) action; an offence of Expiation for each line.[6]

Monks’ Pācittiya 5

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.5 Lying down in a sleeping-place with one who is not ordained for more than two or three nights he falls into two offences; if he lies down in the action there is an offence of wrong-doing; when he has lain down there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 6

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.6 Lying down in a sleeping-place with a woman … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.5.

Monks’ Pācittiya 7

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.7 Teaching Dhamma to a woman in more than five or six sentences he falls into two offences: if he teaches … as in Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.4.

Monks’ Pācittiya 8

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.8 Speaking of a state of further-men that is a fact to one who is not ordained he falls into two offences: if he speaks there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has spoken there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 9

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.9 Speaking of a monk’s very bad offence to one who is not BD.6.57 ordained he falls into two offences: if he speaks … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.9.

Monks’ Pācittiya 10

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.10 Digging the ground he falls into two offences: if he digs there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; in every thrust[7] there is an offence of Expiation.

The First Division: that on Lying

Division 2: on Vegetable-growth

Monks’ Pācittiya 11

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.11 Vin.5.38 Destroying vegetable growth he falls into two offences: if he destroys there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; in every assault[8] there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 12

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.12 Shelving the question by asking another he falls into two offences: if evasion is not laid on him[9] but he shelves the question by asking another there is an offence of wrong-doing; if evasion is laid on him[10] and he shelves the question by asking another there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 13

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.13 Making someone look down on a monk he falls into two offences: while he is making someone look down on there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has made someone look down on there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 14

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.14 Having spread in the open air a couch or chair or a mattress or stool belonging to the Order, and not having removed it, setting out without asking permission (to do so) he falls into two offences: if he makes the first foot go further than a stone’s throw there is an offence of wrong-doing; if he makes the second foot go further there is an offence of Expiation.[11]

Monks’ Pācittiya 15

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.15 Having spread a sleeping-place in a vihāra belonging to an Order, and not having removed it, setting out without asking BD.6.58 for permission (to do so) he falls into two offences: if he makes the first foot go further than the fence there is an offence of wrong-doing; if he makes the second foot go further there is an offence of Expiation.[12]

Monks’ Pācittiya 16

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.16 Lying down in a sleeping-place belonging to an Order knowing that he is encroaching (on the space intended for) a monk who had arrived first he falls into two offences: as he is lying down there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action[13]; when he has lain down there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 17

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.17 Throwing out, being angry and displeased, a monk from a vihāra belonging to an Order he falls into two offences: as he is throwing out there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has thrown out there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 18

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.18 Sitting down on a couch or a chair that has removable feet and is in a lofty cell with an upper part in a vihāra belonging to an Order he falls into two offences: while he is sitting down there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action[14]; when he has sat down there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 19

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.19 Having determined on two or three enclosures, (then) determining on (something) more than that he falls into two offences: while he is determining there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has determined there is an offence of Expiation.[15]

Monks’ Pācittiya 20

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.20 Sprinkling water that he knows contains living things over grass or clay he falls into two offences: while he is sprinkling there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action[16]; when he has sprinkled there is an offence of Expiation.

The Second Division: that on Vegetable-growth

Division 3: on Exhortation

Monks’ Pācittiya 21

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.21 Exhorting nuns (though) he has not been agreed upon (to do so) he falls into two offences: while he is exhorting there is an BD.6.59 offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has exhorted there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 22

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.22 Exhorting nuns after the sun has set … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.22.

Monks’ Pācittiya 23

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.23 Exhorting nuns having approached nuns’ quarters[17]

Monks’ Pācittiya 24

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.24 Saying “Monks are exhorting nuns for the sake of gain” he falls into two offences: while he is speaking there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has spoken there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 25

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.25 Giving robe-material to a nun who is not a relation he falls into two offences: while he is giving there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has given there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 26

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.26 Vin.5.39 Sewing robe-material for a nun who is not a relation he falls into two offences: while he is sewing there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; in each insertion of the awl there is an offence of Expiation.[18]

Monks’ Pācittiya 27

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.27 Going along the same highway having arranged together with a nun he falls into two offences: while he is going along there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has gone along there is an offence of Expiation.[19]

Monks’ Pācittiya 28

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.28 Embarking in one boat having arranged together with a nun he falls into two offences: while he is embarking there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has embarked there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 29

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.29 BD.6.60 Eating almsfood knowing it to be procured through (the intervention of) a nun he falls into two offences: if he accepts it thinking, “I will eat” there is an offence of wrong-doing for every mouthful there is an offence of Expiation.[20]

Monks’ Pācittiya 30

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.30 Sitting down in a private place together with a nun, the one with the other, he falls into two offences: while he is sitting down there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has sat down there is an offence of Expiation.

The Third Division: that on Exhortation

Division 4: on Food

Monks’ Pācittiya 31

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.31 Eating more than one meal at a public rest-house he falls into two offences: if he accepts it thinking, “I will eat” see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.29.

Monks’ Pācittiya 32

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.32 Eating a group-meal he falls into two offences: if he accepts it thinking, “I will eat” …

Monks’ Pācittiya 33

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.33 Eating an out-of-turn meal he falls into two offences: if he accepts it thinking, “I will eat” …[21]

Monks’ Pācittiya 34

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.34 After accepting two or three bowlsful of cake, (then) accepting more than that he falls into two offences: while he is taking it there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action; when he has taken it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 35

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.35 Partaking of solid food or soft food that is not left over after he has eaten and is satisfied he falls into two offences: if he accepts it thinking, “I will eat” … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.29.

Monks’ Pācittiya 36

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.36 Inviting a monk who has eaten and is satisfied to take solid food or soft food that is not left over he falls into two offences: if, at his bidding, he accepts saying, “I will eat, I will partake of” there is an offence of wrong-doing; at the end of the meal there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 37

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.37 Partaking of solid food or soft food at the wrong time he falls into two offences: if he accepts … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.29.

Monks’ Pācittiya 38

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.38 Partaking of solid food or of soft food that has been stored he falls into two offences: if he accepts …

Monks’ Pācittiya 39

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.39 Eating sumptuous foods having asked for them for himself he falls into two offences: if he accepts …[22]

Monks’ Pācittiya 40

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.40 BD.6.61 Conveying to the mouth nutriment that has not been given he falls into two offences: if he accepts …

The Fourth Division: that on Food

Division 5: on an Unclothed Ascetic

Monks’ Pācittiya 41

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.41 Giving with his own hand solid food or soft food to an unclothed ascetic or to a wanderer or to a female wanderer Vin.5.40 he falls into two offences: while he is giving there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action: when he has given there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 42

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.42 Dismissing a monk after saying to him, “Come, your reverence, we will go into a village or market-town for almsfood,” whether he has caused (the almsfood) to be given or has not caused it to be given he falls into two offences: while he is dismissing him there is an offence of wrong-doing in (each) action: when he has dismissed him there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 43

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.43 Sitting down after intruding on a family with food he falls into two offences: while he is sitting down there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has sat down there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 44

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.44 Sitting down in a private place on a secluded seat together with a woman he falls into two offences: while he is sitting down … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.43.

Monks’ Pācittiya 45

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.45 Sitting down in a private place together with a woman, the one with the other, he falls into two offences; while he is sitting down …

Monks’ Pācittiya 46

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.46 Calling upon families before a meal or after a meal and, being invited and being (provided) with a meal, and not asking (for permission to enter) if a monk be there he falls into two offences: when he makes the first foot pass the threshold there is an offence of wrong-doing; when he makes the second foot pass there is an offence of Expiation.[23]

Monks’ Pācittiya 47

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.47 Asking for medicine for longer than that he falls into two offences: while he is asking there is an offence of wrong-doing the action; when he has asked there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 48

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.48 Going to see an army fighting he falls into two offences: BD.6.62 while he is going there is an offence of wrong-doing; standing where he sees there is an offence of Expiation.[24]

Monks’ Pācittiya 49

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.49 Staying with an army for more than three nights he falls into two offences: while he is staying there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has stayed there is an offence of Expiation.[25]

Monks’ Pācittiya 50

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.50 Going to a sham-fight he falls into two offences … as in Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.48.

The Fifth Division: that on an Unclothed Ascetic

Division 6: on Fermented Liquor and Spirits

Monks’ Pācittiya 51

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.51 Drinking strong drink[26] he falls into two offences: if he accepts it thinking.“I will drink,” there is an offence of wrong-doing; for every mouthful there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 52

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.52 Making a monk laugh by tickling him with the fingers he falls into two offences: while he makes him laugh there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has made him laugh there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 53

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.53 Sporting[27] in the water he falls into two offences: if he sports in the water with (the part) below the ankle there is an offence of wrong-doing[28]; if he sports in the water with (the part) above the ankle there is an offence of Expiation.[29]

Monks’ Pācittiya 54

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.54 Being disrespectful he falls into two offences: while he is being disrespectful there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has been disrespectful there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 55

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.55 Frightening a monk he falls into two offences; while he is frightening him there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has frightened him there is an offence of Expiation.[30]

Monks’ Pācittiya 56

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.56 BD.6.63 Warming oneself having kindled a fire he falls into two offences; while he is kindling it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has kindled it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 57

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.57 Bathing at intervals of less than half a month he falls into two offences: while he is bathing there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action[31]; at the end of the bathe there is an offence of Expiation.[32]

Monks’ Pācittiya 58

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.58 Vin.5.41 Making use of a new robe without taking any one of the three modes of disfigurement he falls into two offences; while he is making use of it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has made use of it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 59

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.59 Making use of a robe that has not been taken away and that he himself has assigned to a monk or a nun or a female probationer or a novice or a female novice he falls into two offences; while he is making use of it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has made use of it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 60

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.60 Hiding a monk’s bowl or robe or piece of cloth to sit on or needle-case or girdle he falls into two offences: while he is hiding it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has hidden it there is an offence of Expiation.

The Sixth Division: that on Fermented Liquor and Spirits

Division 7: on What Contains Living Things

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.61 Intentionally depriving a living thing of life how many offences does he fall into? Intentionally depriving a living thing of life he falls into four offences: if he digs a pitfall not on purpose (for a certain man) and thinks, “Whoever falls into it will die” there is an offence of wrong-doing[33]; if a man, falling into it, dies there is an offence involving Defeat[34]; if a yakkha or a peta[35] or an animal in human form, falling into it, dies there is a grave offence; if an animal, falling into it, dies there is an offence of Expiation. Intentionally depriving a living thing of life he falls into these four offences.

Monks’ Pācittiya 62

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.62 BD.6.64 Making use of water knowing that it contains life he falls into two offences; while he is making use of it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has made use of it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 63

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.63 Opening up for a further (formal) act a legal question knowing it has been settled according to the rule he falls into two offences: while he is opening it up there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has opened it up there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 64

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.64 Concealing a monk’s offence knowing it to be a very bad one he falls into one offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 65

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.65 Ordaining a man knowing him to be less than twenty years of age he falls into two offences: while he is ordaining him there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has ordained him there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 66

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.66 Going along the same highway having arranged together with a caravan knowing it to be set on theft he falls into two offences: while he is going along there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has gone along there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 67

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.67 Going along the same highway having arranged together with a woman … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.66.

Monks’ Pācittiya 68

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.68 Not giving up a pernicious view though being admonished up to three times he falls into two offences: an offence of wrong-doing as a result of the motion; an offence of Expiation at the end of the proclamations.[36]

Monks’ Pācittiya 69

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.69 Eating together with a monk knowing him to be one who talks thus, has not acted according to the rule, and has not given up that view he falls into two offences: while he is eating there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action[37]; when he has eaten there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 70

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.70 Vin.5.42 Encouraging a novice knowing him to be thus expelled he falls into two offences: while he is encouraging him there is an offence of wrong-doing[38] in the action; when he has encouraged him there is an offence of Expiation.

The Seventh Division: on What Contains Living Things

Division 8: on Regarding a Rule

Monks’ Pācittiya 71

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.71 BD.6.65 When one is being spoken to by monks regarding a rule, saying, “I will not train myself in this rule of training, your reverences, until I have inquired about it from another monk, experienced, expert in Discipline,” he falls into two offences: while he is speaking there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has spoken there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 72

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.72 Disparaging Discipline he falls into two offences: while he is disparaging there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has disparaged there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 73

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.73 Putting (a monk) in confusion he falls into two offences: if he confuses when confusion has not been put on[39] him there is an offence of wrong-doing; if he confuses when confusion has been put on him there is an offence of Expiation.[40]

Monks’ Pācittiya 74

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.74 Giving a blow to a monk when one is angry and displeased he falls into two offences: as he gives it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has given it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 75

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.75 Raising the palm of one’s hand against a monk when one is angry and displeased he falls into two offences: as he raises it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has raised it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 76

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.76 Defaming a monk with an unfounded charge of an offence requiring a Formal Meeting of the Order he falls into two offences: as he is defaming there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has defamed there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 77

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.77 Intentionally arousing remorse in a monk he falls into two offences: while he is arousing it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has aroused it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 78

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.78 Standing overhearing monks when they are quarrelling, disputing, engaged in contention he falls into two offences: if he goes thinking, “I will hear” there is an offence of wrong-doing; standing where he hears there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 79

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.79 BD.6.66 Engaging in criticism after giving consent for legitimate (formal) acts he falls into two offences: as he criticizes there is an offence of wrong-doing[41] in the action; when he has criticized there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 80

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.80 Rising up from his seat and departing when the Order is engaged in decisive talk without giving his consent he falls into two offences: in leaving the assembly by (the space of) the reach of a hand there is an offence of wrong-doing; when he has left there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 81

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.81 Engaging in criticism after having given away a robe by means of a complete Order he falls into two offences: as he criticizes … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.79.

Monks’ Pācittiya 82

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.82 Apportioning to an individual a benefit belonging to the Order knowing that it has been apportioned he falls into two offences: as he is apportioning it there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has apportioned it there is an offence of Expiation.

The Eighth Division: that on Regarding a Rule

Divison 9: on a King

Monks’ Pācittiya 83

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.83 Entering, without announcing beforehand, the king’s women’s quarters he falls into two offences: as he makes the first foot cross the threshold there is an offence of wrong-doing; as he makes the second foot cross there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 84

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.84 Vin.5.43 Picking up a treasure he falls into two offences: as he picks it up there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has picked it up there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 85

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.85 Entering a village at the wrong time without asking (for permission) if a monk be there he falls into two offences: as he makes the first foot cross the enclosure there is an offence of wrong-doing; as he makes the second foot cross it there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 86

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.86 Having a needle-case made that consists of bone or consists of ivory or consists of horn he falls into two offences: as he is having it made there is an offence of wrong-doing; when he has had it made there is an offence of Expiation.

Monks’ Pācittiya 87

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.87 Having a couch or a chair made exceeding the (proper) measure, he falls into two offences: … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.86.

Monks’ Pācittiya 88

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.88 BD.6.67 Having a couch or a chair made covered with cotton he falls into two offences: … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.86.

Monks’ Pācittiya 89

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.89 Having a piece of cloth to sit upon made exceeding the (proper) measure he falls into two offences: … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.87.

Monks’ Pācittiya 90

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.90 Having an itch-cloth made exceeding the (proper) measure he falls into two offences: … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.87.

Monks’ Pācittiya 91

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.91 Having a cloth for the rains made exceeding the (proper) measure he falls into two offences: … see Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.87.

Monks’ Pācittiya 92

Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.92 Having a robe made the measure of a Well-farer’s robe, how many offences does he fall into? Having a robe made the measure of a Well-farer’s robe he falls into two offences: as he is having it made there is an offence of wrong-doing in the action; when he has had it made there is an offence of Expiation. Having a robe made the measure of a Well-farer’s robe he falls into these two offences.

The Ninth Division: that on a King

Concluded is the Minor (Class)[42]

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. above, BD.6.50.

2.

Vin.4.7ff., which then adds four cases where the offence is one of wrong-doing.

3.

Vin.4.10 gives two cases; also, BD.6.11, two cases where the offence is one of wrong speech.

4.

Vin.4.13 adds three cases where “wrong-doing” is the offence for slandering one who is ordained.

6.

Vin.4.15. The references to these Pācittiyas have been given above BD.6.23ff., and will be repeated here only if some discrepancy is pointed out.

7.

pahāra, a word not in Bu-Pc.10, but possibly referring to the Old Commentary’s “he digs or causes to be dug or breaks or has it broken or burns it or has it burnt”, all of which actions result in a Pācittiya Offence.

8.

Again pahāra, not in Bu-Pc.11, but again a reference may be being made to Old Commentary’s “he cuts it or has it cut or breaks it or has it broken or cooks or has it cooked”—each action giving rise to an offence of Pācittiya

9.

Bu-Pc.12 at Vin.4.37 reads aropite (from a + ropeti, not to plant, not to charge with) and ropite. But above the words are anāropiteāropite, and are words that occur in the Old Commentary to Bu-Pc.73 and mean (something) is not, and is put on (a person). Kaṅkhāvitaraṇī 90 has the one word āropitatā in connection with Bu-Pc.12. Vin-a.770 says that ropeti and aropeti are synonyms.

10.

Bu-Pc.12 at Vin.4.37 reads aropite (from a + ropeti, not to plant, not to charge with) and ropite. But above the words are anāropiteāropite, and are words that occur in the Old Commentary to Bu-Pc.73 and mean (something) is not, and is put on (a person). Kaṅkhāvitaraṇī 90 has the one word āropitatā in connection with Bu-Pc.12. Vin-a.770 says that ropeti and aropeti are synonyms.

11.

Vin.4.40 reads: if he goes further than a stone’s throw of a man of average height, there is an offence of Expiation. Kaṅkhāvitaraṇī 91 is in agreement with the interpretation given above; at Vin-a.775, this is ascribed to the Mahāpaccarī.

12.

Similar confusion as in Prv.1.2:Bu-Pc.14. Vin.4.41 makes it an offence of to go further than the fence of a fenced-in monastery or than the precincts of one that is not fenced-in. Vin-a.777 and Kaṅkhāvitaraṇī 92 appear to agree with the interpretation given above.

13.

E.g. if he spreads his sleeping-place or has it spread for him, see Vin.4.43.

14.

Not at Vin.4.46, Commentary or Kaṅkhāvitaraṇī.

15.

That is, after the building is finished if he adds one item (a tile or a stone, etc.) of any of the five kinds of roofing allowed he incurs the offence.

16.

Enumerated at Kaṅkhāvitaraṇī 96.

17.

According to Vin-a.803 the Mahāpaccarī gives a number of rulings (connected with Bu-Pc.21, Bu-Pc.22, Bu-Pc.23) where there may be a difference of penalty incurred by the same offence, as follows: (1) if the monk is not agreed on, if he goes to the nuns’ quarters after sunset, and if he exhorts them with the eight important rules, there are three offences of Expiation; or (2) there is an offence of wrong-doing because the monk is not agreed on, another offence of because, when he has gone to their quarters he exhorts them with another rule, and an offence of Expiation for exhorting them after the sun as set; or (3) because he is agreed on there is no offence, but an offence of with Expiation for exhorting them after sunset, and another for exhorting them with the eight important rules when he has gone (to their quarters); or (4) no offence because he is agreed on, one of wrong-doing if he exhorts them with another rule, one of Expiation if he exhorts them after sunset.

18.

As at Vin.4.62. According to Vin-a.805 “insertion” seems to mean inserting the needle and drawing it out; but if one runs a long thread along without drawing out the needle there is but one offence of Expiation.

19.

At Vin-a.807 Buddhaghosa gives the Mahāpaccarī’s version (that if they were both going to the same village in any case and happened to leave their quarters at the same time, there was no offence), but he says that this agrees neither with the Pali nor with the other Commentaries.

20.

As at Vin.4.67.

21.

Vin-a.817f. gives the interpretations of the Mahāpaccarī and of the Mahāaṭṭhakathā in a certain amount of detail together with one interpretation it attributes to the Kurundī.

22.

Vin-a.841 here quotes Parivāra p.218, verse 32: kāyikāni na vācasikāni

23.

As at Vin.4.100.

25.

Vin.4.106 says he may stay for two or three nights; but if he stays until sunset of the fourth day there is an offence of Expiation.

26.

majja; the word in the sikkhāpada at Vin.4.110 and text p.21 above is surāmeraya.

27.

kīḷanto here; at Vin.4.112 and text p.21 hāsadhamme is the word used in the sikkhāpada, kīḷati coming later.

28.

As at Vin.4.112.

29.

Vin.4.112 says if he goes under or comes up or “swims” (plavatī ti tarati. Vin-a.861) there is an offence of Expiation; Commentary appears to agree.

30.

Frightening a monk by whatever means is an offence of Expiation at Vin.4.114.

31.

Agrees with Vin.4.119.

32.

Agrees with Vin.4.119.

35.

peta, departed ancestor, a kind of ghost. Neither Vin.4.124 nor Vin-a.864 mentions any of the beings spoken of in this clause.

36.

As at Vin.4.136.

37.

No offence of wrong-doing appears at Vin.4.140, except in cases of doubting.

38.

No offence of wrong-doing appears at Vin.4.140, except in cases of doubting.

39.

anāropite … āropite. See above, BD.6.57, n.3.

40.

As at Vin.4.145.

41.

At Vin.4.152 there is no offence of wrong-doing.

42.

As at Vin.4.174.

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