Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

2.10. Nuns’ Analysis: on How Many Offences?

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Nuns’ Pārājika 5

Prv.2.10:Bi-Pj.5 Because of consenting to physical contact how many offences does she fall into? Because of consenting to physical contact she falls into five offences. If a nun filled with desire, consents to taking hold of a man who is filled with desire below the collar-bone, above the circle of the knees, there is an offence involving Defeat. If a monk rubs (her) body with (his) body the offence is one requiring a Formal Meeting of the Order. If she rubs something attached to the body with the body there is a grave offence. If she rubs something attached to the body with something attached to the body there is an offence of wrong-doing. In tickling with the fingers there is an offence of Expiation.[1] Because of consenting to physical contact she falls into these five offences.

Nuns’ Pārājika 6

Prv.2.10:Bi-Pj.6 BD.6.119 Because of concealing a fault how many offences does she fall into? … into four offences. If a nun knowingly conceals a matter involving Defeat the offence is one involving Defeat. If, being in doubt, she conceals it, there is a grave offence. If a monk conceals an offence requiring a Formal Meeting of the Order there is an offence of Expiation[2]; if she conceals a falling away from good behaviour there is an offence of wrong-doing. Because of concealing a fault she falls into these four offences.

Nuns’ Pārājika 7

Prv.2.10:Bi-Pj.7 Because of not giving up (her course) though being admonished up to the third time … she falls into five offences. If a nun who is an imitator of one who is suspended does not give up (her course) though being admonished up to the third time, following the motion there is an offence of wrong-doing, following the two resolutions there are grave offences, following the conclusion of the (three) resolutions there is an offence involving Defeat.[3] If a nun who is an imitator of a schismatic does not give up (her course) though being admonished up to the third time there is an offence requiring a Formal Meeting of the Order.[4] If she does not give up (her) pernicious views though being admonished up to the third time there is an offence of Expiation.[5] Because of not giving up (her course) though being admonished up to the third time she falls into these five offences.

Nuns’ Pārājika 8

Prv.2.10:Bi-Pj.8 Because of completing the eighth thing … she falls into three offences … see Vin.5.72 … she falls into these three offences.

Concluded are the Offences involving Defeat

Footnotes and references:

1.

Monks’ Bu-Pc.52. For some of these offences see the offences given after the formulation of this rule, at Vin.4.111. See also note at BD.2.387. See BD.3, Introduction, p.xxviiff. for the rules of training that were shared by monks and nuns.

2.

Cf. Monks’ Bu-Pc.64 which reads “very bad offence” for “one requiring a formal Meeting of the Order”. But the Old Commentary says that the 13 offences of this kind and the four involving Defeat are what is meant by “very bad offence”, duṭṭhullā āpatti, see Vin.4.31, Vin.4.128.

3.

As at Vin.4.219.

4.

See Vin.2.201.

5.

Monks’ Bu-Pc.68.