Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

2.8. Nuns’ Analysis: on Accumulation

Prv.2.8 How many offences does a nun, filled with desire, consenting to physical contact with a man who is filled with desire fall into? … She falls into three offences … see Prv.2.2.

Consenting to physical contact with a man who is filled with desire how many offences does a nun who is filled with desire fall into? Consenting … a nun who is filled with desire falls into three offences: if she consents to taking hold of below the collar-bone … see Vin.5.71f. … she falls into these three offences. Of the four fallings away how many fallings away do these offences appertain to? Of the seven classes of offence in how many classes of offence are they comprised? Of the six origins of offences by how many origins do they originate? Of the four legal questions which legal question? Of the seven decidings by how many decidings are they stopped? Of the four fallings away these offences … see Prv.1.8 and by a covering over (as) with grass …

BD.6.116 Partaking of curds, having had them asked for, how many offences does she fall into? Partaking of curds, having had them asked for, she falls into two offences: as she accepts saying, “I will partake of,” the offence is one of wrong-doing; for every mouthful the offence is one to be Confessed. Partaking of curds … she falls into these two offences. Of the four fallings away how many fallings away do these offences appertain to … by which deciding are they stopped? Of the four fallings away these offences appertain to one falling away; the falling away from good behaviour. Of the seven classes of offence they are comprised in two classes of offence: it may be in the class of offence that is to be Confessed; it may be in the class of offence of wrong-doing. Of the six origins of offences they originate by four origins: it may be that they originate by body, not by speech, not by mind; it may be that they originate by body and by speech, not by mind; it may be that they originate by body and by mind, not by speech; it may be that they originate by body and by speech and by mind. Of the four legal questions the legal question concerning offences. Of the seven decidings they are stopped by three … and by a covering over (as) with grass.

Concluded is the Eighth Chapter: on Accumulation

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