Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Factors for undertaking on one’s own behalf

Kd.19.4BD.5.344 Then the venerable Upāli approached the Lord; having approached, having greeted the Lord, he sat down at a respectful distance. As he was sitting down at a respectful distance, the venerable Upāli spoke thus to the Lord:

“Lord, if a monk wishes to undertake an undertaking on his own behalf,[1] endowed with how many qualities is the undertaking that he may undertake on his own behalf?”

“Upāli, if a monk wishes to undertake an undertaking on his own behalf, the undertaking that he may undertake on his own behalf is endowed with five qualities. Upāli, if a monk wishes to undertake an undertaking on his own behalf, he should consider this: ‘That undertaking which I wish to undertake on my own behalf, is it the right time to undertake this undertaking on my own behalf, or not?’ If, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘It is a wrong time[2] to undertake this undertaking on my own behalf, not a right time,’ Upāli, that undertaking on his own behalf should not be undertaken. But if, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘It is a right time to undertake this undertaking on my own behalf, not a wrong time,’ Upāli, it should be further considered by that monk: ‘That undertaking which I wish to undertake on my own behalf, is this undertaking on my own behalf about a true thing, or not?’ If, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘That under-taking on my own behalf is about an untrue thing, not a true thing,’ Upāli, that undertaking on his own behalf should not be undertaken. But if, Upāli, while that monk is considering he knows thus: ‘That undertaking on my own behalf is about a true thing, not an untrue thing,’ Upāli, it should be further considered by that monk: ‘That undertaking which I wish to undertake on my own behalf, is that undertaking connected with the goal, or not?’ If, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘This undertaking on my own behalf is unconnected with the goal,[3] not connected with it,’ Upāli, BD.5.345 that undertaking on his own behalf should not be undertaken. But if, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘This undertaking on my own behalf is connected with the goal, not unconnected with it.’ Upāli, it should be further considered by that monk: ‘Will I, undertaking this undertaking on my own behalf, attract[4] monks who are comrades and associates to my side in accordance with dhamma, in accordance with discipline, or not?’ If, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘I, undertaking this undertaking on my own behalf, will not attract monks who are comrades and associates to my side in accordance with dhamma, in accordance with discipline,’ Upāli, that undertaking on his own behalf should not be undertaken. But, if, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: Vin.2.248 ‘I, undertaking this undertaking on my own behalf, will attract monks who are comrades and associates to my side in accordance with dhamma, in accordance with discipline,’ Upāli, it should be further considered by that monk: ‘From my having undertaken this undertaking on my own behalf, will there be for the Order from that source strife, quarrel, dispute, contention, schism in the Order, dissension in the Order, altercation in the Order, differences in the Order,[5] or not?’ If, Upāli, while this monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘From my having undertaken this undertaking on my own behalf, there will be for the Order from that source strife … differences in the Order,’ Upāli, that undertaking should not be undertaken on his own behalf. But if, Upāli, while that monk is considering, he knows thus: ‘From my having undertaken this undertaking on my own behalf, there will not be for the Order from that source strife … differences in the Order,’ Upāli, that undertaking on his own behalf may be undertaken. Thus, Upāli, if an undertaking on one’s own behalf is undertaken when it is endowed with these five qualities, later it will be no cause for remorse.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

attādānaṃ ādātukāmena. Vin-a.1288 says “here a monk wishing to search (or purify, sodhetu) the teaching—whatever legal question he undertakes on his own behalf (or, appropriates to himself, attanā ādiyati), that is called attādāna.”

2.

Vin-a.1288 says a wrong time means when there is fear of kings, of thieves, of a scarcity of food, or if it is the rains-season.

3.

Vin-a.1288: it leads to danger to life, danger to the Brahma-faring.

4.

labhissāmi.