Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Setting aside the Pātimokkha by rule

Kd.19.3.4 “How (can it be said that) one who is defeated is sitting in that assembly? This is a case, monks, where by reason of those properties,[1] by reason of those features, by reason of those signs by which there comes to be commission of an offence involving defeat a monk sees (another) monk committing an offence involving defeat; or it may be that that monk does not himself see a monk Vin.2.244 committing an offence involving defeat, but that another monk tells that monk: ‘The monk So-and-so, your reverence, is committing an offence involving defeat’; or it may be that that monk does not himself see a monk committing an offence involving defeat and that no other monk tells that monk: ‘The monk So-and-so, your reverence, is committing an offence involving defeat,’ but that he himself tells the monk: ‘I, your reverence, have committed an offence involving defeat.’ Monks, that monk if he so desires, on account of what he has seen, or has heard, or has suspected may, on an Observance day, whether it is the fourteenth or the fifteenth, utter in the midst of the Order when that individual is present: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This individual So-and-so is committing an offence involving defeat. I am suspending the Pātimokkha for him. The Pātimokkha should not be recited in his presence.’ This suspension of the Pātimokkha is legally valid. When the Pātimokkha has been suspended for that monk, if the assembly removes itself on account of any one of the ten dangers[2]—the danger from kings or … thieves or … fire or … water or … human beings or … non-human beings or … beasts of prey or … creeping things or because of danger to life or because of danger to the Brahma-faring—monks, that monk, if he so desires, may either in that residence or in another residence, utter in the midst of the Order in the presence of that individual: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The talk on the individual So-and-so’s offence involving defeat was still going forward; that matter is not decided. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may decide this matter.’ BD.5.343 If he succeeds thus, that is good. If he does not succeed, he should, on an Observance day, whether the fourteenth or the fifteenth, utter in the midst of the Order and in the presence of that individual: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The talk on the individual So-and-so’s offence involving defeat was still going forward; that matter is not decided. I am suspending the Pātimokkha for him, the Pātimokkha should not be recited in his presence.’ This suspension of the Pātimokkha is legally valid.

Kd.19.3.5 “How (can it be said that) one who has disavowed the training is sitting in that assembly? This is a case, monks … Vin.2.245 the same as Kd.19.3.4, reading disavowed the training instead of offence involving defeat … This suspension of the Pātimokkha is legally valid.

Kd.19.3.6 “How (can it be said that) he does not submit himself to a legally valid complete assembly? This is a case, monks … the same as Kd.19.3.4, reading does not submit himself to a legally valid complete assembly instead of offence involving defeatVin.2.246 … This suspension of the Pātimokkha is legally valid.

Kd.19.3.7 “How (can it be said that) he withdraws his acceptance (of a formal act settled) in a legally valid complete assembly? This is a case, monks, … the same as Kd.19.3.4 reading withdraws his acceptance of a formal act settled in a legally valid complete assembly instead of offence involving defeat … This suspension of the Pātimokkha is legally valid.

Kd.19.3.8 “How (can it be said that) he is seen, heard or suspected of falling away from moral habit? This is a case, monks, … the same as Kd.19.3.4 reading seen, heard or suspected of falling away from moral habit instead of offence involving defeat … This suspension of the Pātimokkha is legally valid.

Kd.19.3.9 “How (can it be said that) he is seen, heard or suspected of falling away from good habits? This is a case, monks, … see Kd.19.3.8

“How (can it be said that) be is seen, heard or suspected of falling away from right views? This is a case, monks, … Vin.2.247 see Kd.19.3.8 … This suspension of the Pātimokkha is legally valid. These ten suspensions of the Pātimokkha are legally valid.”

The First Portion for Recital.

Footnotes and references:

1.

As at Vin.3.27.

2.

See rule at Kd.2.15.4.