Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Those deserving to hear the Pātimokkha

Kd.19.2.1 Then the Lord addressed the monks, saying: “Now, I, monks, henceforth will not carry out the Observance, I will not recite the Pātimokkha; now you yourselves, monks, must henceforth carry out the Observance, must recite the Pātimokkha. It is not possible, monks, it cannot come to pass that the Truth-finder should carry out the Observance, should recite the Pātimokkha with an assembly that is not entirely pure. Nor, monks, should the Pātimokkha be heard by one who has an offence.[1] Whoever (such) should hear it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, to suspend the Pātimokkha for him who, having an offence, hears the Pātimokkha.[2] And thus, monks, should it be suspended:[3] On an Observance day, whether it be the fourteenth or the fifteenth, when that individual is present Vin.2.241 this should be uttered in the midst of the Order: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The individual So-and-so has an offence; I am suspending the Pātimokkha for him, the Pātimokkha should not be recited when he is present’—(thus) does the Pātimokkha become suspended.”


Kd.19.3.1 BD.5.337 Now at that time the group of six monks,[4] thinking: “No one knows about us,” listened to the Pātimokkha although they had offences. Monks who were elders, knowing the minds of others, told the monks: “So-and-so and So-and-so, your reverences, (belonging to) the group of six monks, thinking, ‘No one knows about us,’ listened to the Pātimokkha although they had offences.” The group of six monks heard it said that the monks who were elders, knowing the minds of others, had told the monks: “So-and-so and So-and-so … listened to the Pātimokkha although they had offences.” These, thinking: “In case the well behaved monks suspend the Pātimokkha for us,” suspended first, without ground, without reason, the Pātimokkha for the pure monks who had no offences. These who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can this group of six monks suspend, without ground, without reason, the Pātimokkha for pure monks who have no offences?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Is it true, as is said, monks, that the group of six monks suspended, without ground, without reason, the Pātimokkha for pure monks who have no offences?”

“It is true, Lord.” Having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Monks, you should not, without ground, without reason, suspend the Pātimokkha for pure monks who have no offences. Whoever should (so) suspend it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. Kd.2.27.1.

2.

Kd.11.5.1 says that it may not be suspended (ṭhapeti) for a regular monk.

3.

Cf. suspending the Invitation, Kd.4.16.2 which follows a similar course.

4.

Cf. Kd.4.16.3.

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