Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Covering over with grass

Kd.14.13.1 Now at that time, while monks were striving, quarrelling, disputing, much was perpetrated and spoken that was not worthy of a recluse.[1] Then it occurred to these monks: “While we were striving … not worthy of a recluse. If we should deal with one another for these offences, it might even be that that legal question would conduce to harshness, to trouble, to schism. Now, Vin.2.87 what line of conduct should be followed by us?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

BD.5.115 “This is a case, monks, where while monks were striving … much was perpetrated and spoken that was not worthy of a recluse. Then it occurred to these monks: ‘While we were striving … it might even be that that legal question would conduce to harshness, to trouble, to schism.’ I allow, monks, a legal question such as this to be settled by the covering up (as) with grass.[2]

Kd.14.13.2 “And thus, monks, should it be settled: One and all should gather together in the same place; having gathered together, the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. While we were striving … ‘… it might even be that this legal question would conduce to harshness, to trouble, to schism.’ If it seems right to the Order, the Order may settle this legal question by the covering up (as) with grass, unless it is a heavy sin,[3] unless it is connected with the laity.[4] The one side[5] should be informed by an experienced, competent monk from among the monks siding in with the one (side): ‘Let the venerable ones listen to me. While we were striving … not worthy of a recluse … to schism. If it is pleasing to the venerable ones, I would confess whatever is the offence of the venerable ones as well as whatever is my own offence both for the sake of the venerable ones and for my own sake, unless it is a heavy sin, unless it is connected with the laity, (so as to obtain) a covering up (as) with grass in the midst of the Order.’ Afterwards, the other side should be informed by an experienced, competent monk from among the monks siding in with the other (side): ‘Let the venerable ones listen to me. While we were striving … a covering up (as with) grass in the midst of the Order.

Kd.14.13.3 “The Order should be informed by an experienced competent monk siding in with the one (side): ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. While we were striving … not worthy of a recluse … to schism. If it seems right to the Order, I would confess whatever is the offence of the venerable BD.5.116 ones as well as whatever is my own offence, both for the sake of the venerable ones and for my own sake, unless it is a heavy sin, unless it is connected with the laity, (so as to obtain) a covering up (as) with grass in the midst of the Order. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. While we were striving … not worthy of recluse … to schism. I am confessing whatever is the offence of these venerable ones and whatever is my own offence … unless it is a heavy sin, unless it is connected with the laity, (so as to obtain) a covering up (as with) grass in the midst of the Order. If the confession of these offences of ours, unless they are heavy sins, unless they are connected with the laity, (so as to obtain) a covering up (as) with grass in the midst of the Order is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. These offences of ours are confessed (by me), except heavy sins, except those connected with the laity, (so as to obtain) a covering up (as) with grass in the midst of the Order. Vin.2.88 It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.

“Afterwards the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk from among the monks siding in with the other (side): ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. While we were striving … Thus do I understand this.

Kd.14.13.4 “And thus, monks, do these offences come to be removed from these monks,[6] except for a heavy sin, except for what is connected with the laity, except for (those who make) an open statement of their views,[7] except for those who are not there.”[8]

Footnotes and references:

1.

As at Kd.14.5.1.

2.

tiṇavatthāraka. As at Vin.4.207, MN.ii.250. See BD.3.154.

3.

thūlavajja, Vin-a.1194, explaining as Pārājika and Saṅghādisesa.

4.

Commentary says: unless it is an offence where he reviles and despises householders by means of a low thing; see under “insulting speech” at Vin.4.6 (BD.2.173ff.); also above, BD.5.25.

5.

saka pakkha, one’s own side.

6.

te bhikkhū tāhi āpattīhi vuṭṭhitā honti, literally “these monks are risen up (or, removed) from these offences.”

7.

diṭṭhāvikamma. Vin-a.1194 says “those who say, ‘It is not pleasing to me’ and explain their views to one another, or, having fallen into offence together with these who have not come there, or who have come and given (someone’s) leave for being absent while sitting down in cells and so on—these have not risen from those offences. Therefore it is said: except for (those who make) an open statement of their views, except for those who are not there.”

8.

ṭhapetvā ye na tattha honti. See previous note.

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