Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Verdict in the presence of

Vin.2.73 Kd.14.1.1 BD.5.96 At one time the Awakened One, the Lord, was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks carried out (formal) acts of censure and guidance and banishment and reconciliation and suspension against monks who were not present. Those who were modest monks looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “How can this group of six monks carry out (formal) acts of censure … and suspension against monks who are not present?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Is it true, as is said, monks, that these monks carried out (formal) acts of censure … and suspension against monks who were not present?”

“It is true, Lord.” The Awakened One, the Lord, rebuked them, saying:

“It is not fitting, monks, in these foolish men, it is not becoming, it is not suitable, it is not worthy of a recluse, it is not allowable, it is not to be done. How, monks, can these foolish men carry out (formal) acts of censure … and suspension against monks who are not present? It is not monks, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased …” Having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Monks, a (formal) act of censure or guidance or banishment or reconciliation or suspension should not be carried out against monks who are not present. Whoever should carry one out, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Kd.14.2.1 “An individual who professes non-dhamma makes known to an individual who professes dhamma, disposes him favourably, makes him consider, makes him reconsider, teaches him, teaches him again, saying: ‘This is dhamma, this is discipline, this is the Teacher’s instruction, choose this, Vin.2.74 approve of this.’ If this legal question is settled thus, it is settled by what BD.5.97 is not rule, by what has the appearance of a verdict in the presence of.[1]

“An individual who professes non-dhamma makes known to several who profess dhamma … An individual who professes non-dhamma makes known to an Order which professes dhamma … Several who profess non-dhamma make known to an individual who professes dhamma … Several who profess non-dhamma make known to several who profess dhamma … Several who profess non-dhamma make known to an Order which professes dhamma … An Order which professes non-dhamma makes known to an individual who professes dhamma … An Order which professes non-dhamma makes known to several who profess dhamma … An Order which professes non-dhamma makes known to an Order which professes dhamma, disposes it favourably, makes it consider, makes it reconsider, teaches it, teaches it again, saying: ‘This is dhamma, this is discipline, this is the Teacher’s instruction, choose this, approve of this.’ If this legal question is settled thus, it is settled by what is not rule, by what has the appearance of a verdict in the presence of.”

Told are the Nine Cases of the Dark Faction.

Kd.14.3.1 “An individual who professes dhamma makes known to an individual who professes non-dhamma … An Order which professes dhamma makes known to an Order which professes non-dhamma … If this legal question is settled thus, it is settled by rule, by a verdict in the presence of.”

Told are the Nine Cases of the Bright Faction.

Footnotes and references:

1.

sammukhāvinayapaṭirūpaka. On sammukhāvinaya., see Vin.2.93ff., and BD.3.153, n.2 for further references.

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