Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

One hundred on mānatta

Kd.13.29.1 “This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen into BD.5.83 several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, leaves the Order not having concealed them. He, being ordained again, does not conceal those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed upon that monk.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, Vin.2.63 having fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, leaves the Order not having concealed them. He, on being ordained again, conceals those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen … leaves the Order having concealed them. He, on being ordained again, does not conceal those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier concealed.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen … leaves the Order, having concealed them. He, on being ordained again, conceals those offences. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

Kd.13.29.2 “This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. His offences are both concealed and not concealed. He, having left the Order, on being ordained again, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he concealed, afterwards he conceals those offences which formerly he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, does not afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he concealed, does not[1] afterwards conceal those offences which formerly he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

BD.5.84 “This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he concealed, afterwards conceals those offences which formerly he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

Kd.13.29.3 “This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. He knows some to be offences, he does not know others to be offences. The offences which he knows to be offences he conceals, those offences Vin.2.64 which he does not know to be offences he does not conceal. He, having left the Order, on being ordained again, conceals those offences which earlier he had known, does not conceal those offences which later he had known, does not conceal those offences which earlier he had not known, does not conceal those offences which later he had known. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, does not conceal those offences, (although) knowing them, which formerly, knowing them he concealed, afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, not knowing them, he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks, … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, knowing them he concealed, afterwards does not conceal those offences, knowing them, which formerly he did not conceal, not knowing them. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on this monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

“This is a case, monks … on being ordained again, afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, knowing them, he concealed; afterwards conceals those offences, knowing them, which formerly, not knowing them, he did not conceal. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier and later concealed.

Kd.13.29.4 BD.5.85 “This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. He remembers some to be offences … = Kd.13.29.3. Instead of he knows, knowing, not knowing, read he remembers, remembering, not remembering … thus earlier and later concealed.

Kd.13.29.5 “This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order. He is in no doubt as to some of the offences, he is in doubt as to others of the offences … thus earlier and later concealed.

Kd.13.30.1 “This is a case, monks, where a monk, having fallen into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, becomes a novice … becomes mad … becomes unhinged in mind … this should be explained in detail as below.[2] He comes to be in pain. His offences are concealed as well as unconcealed. He knows that some are offences, he does not know that others are offences. He remembers that some are offences, Vin.2.65 he does not remember that others are offences. He is in no doubt that some are offences, he is in doubt as to whether others are offences. He conceals those offences about which he is in no doubt, he does not conceal those offences about which he is in doubt. He comes to be in pain. Having come to be again not in pain, those offences which formerly he concealed because he was in no doubt, he afterwards does not conceal although he is in no doubt; those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards does not conceal although he is in doubt, those offences which formerly he concealed, being in no doubt, he afterwards does not conceal, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards conceals, not being in doubt, those offences which formerly he concealed, being in no doubt, he afterwards conceals, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards does not conceal, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he concealed, being in no doubt, he afterwards conceals, being in no doubt, those offences which formerly he did not conceal, being in doubt, he afterwards conceals, being in no doubt. Monks, mānatta (discipline) should BD.5.86 be imposed on this monk, having granted him probation on account of the set of offences thus earlier as well as later concealed.”

The Hundred on Mānatta.

Footnotes and references:

1.

See Vinaya Texts ii.423, n.2, on the right way of making up the hundred cases mentioned at the end of Kd.13.30.

2.

I.e. in Kd.13.27, “below” corresponds to our “above” in such contexts, as it refers to the palm-leaf manuscripts

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