Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Kd.13.27.1 “Now at that time a certain monk, while doing probation, left the Order. Having come back again, he asked the monks for ordination. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “This is a case, monks, where a monk, doing probation, leaves the Order. Monks, the probation of one who leaves the Order is not effective. If he is ordained again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him:[1] whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, he must do probation (for any portion of time) remaining.

BD.5.80 “This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, becomes a novice. Monks, the probation of a novice is not effective. If he is ordained again … as in preceding paragraph … remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, becomes mad. Monks, the probation of one who is mad is not effective. If he becomes sane again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, he must do probation (for any portion of time) remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, becomes unhinged in mind. Monks, the probation of one who is unhinged in mind Vin.2.61 is not effective. If he becomes not unhinged in mind again … This is a case, monks, where a monk, doing probation, becomes afflicted by pain. Monks, the probation of one afflicted by pain is not effective. If he becomes not afflicted by pain again … he must do probation for (any portion of time) remaining.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk, while doing probation, is suspended for not seeing an offence … for not making amends for an offence … for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the probation of one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, he must do probation for (any portion of time) remaining.

Kd.13.27.2 “This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves to be sent back to the beginning leaves the Order. Monks, the sending back to the beginning is not effective for one who leaves the Order. If he is ordained again, the earlier granting of the probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, that monk must be sent back to the beginning.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves to be sent back to the beginning becomes a novice … becomes mad … as in Kd.13.27.1 … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the sending back to the beginning of one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of the probation is just as it was for him: BD.5.81 whatever probation is granted is properly granted, that monk must be sent back to the beginning.

Kd.13.27.3 This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves mānatta (discipline) leaves the Order. Monks, the imposing of mānatta (discipline) on one who leaves the Order is not effective. If he is ordained again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly-granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves mānatta (discipline) becomes a novice … becomes mad … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the imposing of mānatta (discipline) on one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on that monk.

Kd.13.27.4 “This is a case, monks, where a monk who is undergoing mānatta (discipline) leaves the Order … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, the undergoing of mānatta (discipline) for one who is suspended is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, whatever mānatta (discipline) is imposed is properly imposed, whatever mānatta (discipline) is undergone is undergone thoroughly, it must be undergone for (any portion of time) remaining.

Kd.13.27.5 “This is a case, monks, where a monk who deserves rehabilitation leaves the Order … is suspended for not giving up a wrong view. Monks, rehabilitation of one who is suspended Vin.2.62 is not effective. If he is restored again, the earlier granting of probation is just as it was for him: whatever probation is granted is properly granted, whoever does probation does probation thoroughly, whatever mānatta (discipline) is imposed is properly imposed, whatever mānatta (discipline) is undergone is undergone thoroughly, that monk may be rehabilitated.

Kd.13.27.6 Concluded are the Forty Cases.[2]

Footnotes and references:

1.

I.e. on being re-ordained, he is to take up his period of probation again where he left it off, so as to complete the number of nights for which probation was originally granted him. Probation is “not broken”, another meaning of rūhati.

2.

There are eight possibilities (leaving the Order down to the three reasons for being suspended) under each of the five headings (doing probation, deserving to be sent back to the beginning, deserving mānatta, undergoing mānatta, deserving rehabilitation).