Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Duties of one deserving rehabilitation

Kd.12.9.1 BD.5.53 Now at that time monks who deserved rehabilitation consented to regular monks greeting them … = Kd.12.1.1, Kd.12.1.2 “… ‘Do not let him find out about me.’ Monks, a monk who deserves rehabilitation should not go from a residence where there are monks to a residence where there are no monks … from a residence or from what is not a residence where there are monks to a residence or to what is not a residence where there are no monks, except with a regular (monk), unless there is a danger. Monks, a monk who deserves rehabilitation may go from a residence where there are monks to Vin.2.37 a residence where there are monks … may go from a residence or from what is not a residence where there are monks to a residence or to what is not a residence where there are monks, if the monks there should belong to the same communion, and if he knows, ‘I am able to arrive this very day.’ Monks, a monk who deserves rehabilitation should not stay in a residence under one roofing with a regular monk … he should I not pace up and down in a place for pacing up and down in if he is pacing up and down on the ground. Monks, a monk who deserves rehabilitation should not stay in a residence under one roofing with a monk under probation … with a monk who deserves to be sent back to the beginning … with a monk who deserves mānatta ( (discipline) … with a monk undergoing mānatta ( (discipline) … with a senior monk who deserves rehabilitation … and ought not to be carried out.”

Kd.12.10.1 Told is the Second Section: that on Being under Probation.

In this Section are five items. This is its key:

Those under probation consent to a regular monk’s greeting,
standing up before, joined palms, proper duties,[1] seat, /
Bringing forward a sleeping-place, water for the feet, a footstool, a footstand,
the bowl, treating the back by massaging,
and well-behaved ones looked down upon.[2] /
BD.5.54 If one consents there is wrong-doing,[3] mutual, five things according to seniority[4]:
Observance, Invitation, (cloths for) the rains, gifts, food.[5] /
And proper conduct, the carriage there, in regard to a regular monk,[6]
and whatever is the last, neither as the novice in front of nor behind,[7] /
Forest, bringing back food, when coming in, at the Observance,
and at the Invitation, and by a messenger,[8] and he may go to where there are monks. /
Under one roofing and getting up and likewise in regard to offering,[9] /
on a seat, in a high place for pacing up and down in,
on the ground and not in a place for pacing up and down in, /
With a senior—not a (formal) act, interruptions[10] and carryings through,
postponing, taking up should be stated (by) one under probation.[11] /
To the beginning, those deserving mānatta, likewise those undergoing mānatta,
and also he who deserves rehabilitation—again the composing by the method. /
Three[12] for those under probation, four[13] for one undergoing mānatta.
BD.5.55 As with the three interruptions, so there is ‘daily’ for those undergoing mānatta.[14]
Two (formal) acts are similar, the remaining three (formal) acts are exactly the same. Vin.2.38

Footnotes and references:

1.

Oldenberg’s edition reads: añjali-sāmiyaṃ āsanam; Sinhalese edition reads: añjaliñ ca sāmīciyaṃ; Siamese edition reads: añjaliñ c’eva sāmiciṃ. Sinhalese and Siamese begin next line with āsanaṃ.

2.

Oldenberg’s edition has a line less than Sinhalese and Siamese editions, which I follow.

3.

Both Sinhalese and Siamese read dukkaṭaṃ, as against Oldenberg’s dukkaṭa.

4.

Sinhalese and Siamese read yathā vuḍḍhaṃ (as Kd.2.1.1); Oldenberg’s edition has punāpare; cf. punāpare at Snp.1004.

5.

Oldenberg’s and Sinhalese editions read vassik-oṇoja-bhojanaṃ; Siamese edition vassikañcāvaṇojanaṃ, and it begins the next line with bhattaṃ (omitted by Oldenberg and Sinhalese), which is the word used at end of Kd.2.1.1, bhojana not occurring there at all.

6.

pakatattassa gacchanaṃ, Oldenberg; pakatattena gacchare, Sinhalese and Siamese editions. This refers to not walking or sitting down in front of a regular monk (Kd.2.1.2).

7.

Sinhalese and Siamese editions: na pure pacchā samaṇena; Oldenberg: pure pacchā tath’ eva ca.

8.

Sinhalese and Siamese editions: dūtena; Oldenberg; dūto.

9.

Sinhalese and Siamese editions read: ekacchanne na (Sinhalese ca) vatthabbaṃ na chamāyaṃ nisajjite.

10.

Sinhalese and Siamese editions read: ratticchedā; Oldenberg: ratticchedo.

11.

Sinhalese and Siamese editions read: nikkipanaṃ samādānaṃ ñātabbaṃ pārivāsikā; Oldenberg: nikkhipanaṃ samādānaṃ, ratti vā pārivāsike.

12.

Referring to “interruptions”, as at Kd.12.2.1, Kd.12.7.1

13.

Referring to “interruptions”, as at Kd.12.2.1, Kd.12.7.1

14.

saman tiratticchedesu mānattesu ca devasi (Oldenberg and Sinhalese) meaning, I take it, that as there is an extra “interruption” for one undergoing mānatta, so he has to make an extra “announcement” (beginning of Kd.12.6.1). Siamese edition reads: na samenti ratticchedā mānattesu ca devāsikaṃ, “the interruptions do not agree (or, are not in accordance, not on all fours) and there is ‘daily’ for those undergoing mānatta”.

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