Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Duties of one undergoing mānatta

Kd.12.6.1 Now at that time monks undergoing mānatta (discipline) consented to regular monks greeting them … = Kd.12.1.1, Kd.12.1.2 Instead of under probation read undergoing mānatta (discipline) “… ‘Do not let them find out about me’. Monks, a monk undergoing mānatta (discipline) should announce it when he is incoming, he should announce it to (another who is) incoming, he should announce it at the Observance, he should announce it at the Invitation, he should announce it daily,[1] if he is ill he should announce it by means of a messenger.

Monks, a monk undergoing mānatta (discipline) should not go from a residence where there are monks to a residence where there are no monks, except with an Order,[2] unless there is a danger … should not go from a residence or from what is not a residence where there are monks to a residence or to what is not a residence where there are no monks, except with an Order, unless there is a danger … should not go from a residence or from what is not a residence where there are monks Vin.2.36 to a residence or to what is not a residence where there are monks if the monks there should belong to a different communion, except with an Order, unless there is a danger. Monks, a monk undergoing mānatta (discipline) may go from BD.5.52 a residence where there are monks to a residence where there are monks … from a residence or from what is not a residence where there are monks to a residence or to what is not a residence where there are monks if the monks there should belong to the same communion and if he knows, ‘I am able to arrive this very day.’

Monks, a monk undergoing mānatta (discipline) should not stay in a residence under one roofing with a regular monk … = Kd.12.1.4 … he should not pace up and down in a place to pace up and down in if he is pacing up and down on the ground. Monks, a monk undergoing mānatta (discipline) should not stay in a residence under one roofing with a monk under probation … with a monk who deserves to be sent back to the beginning …with a monk who deserves mānatta (discipline) … with a senior monk who is undergoing mānatta (discipline) … with a monk who deserves rehabilitation … and ought not to be carried out.”

Kd.12.7.1 Then the venerable Upāli approached the Lord; having approached, having greeted the Lord, he sat down at a respectful distance. As he was sitting down at a respectful distance, the venerable Upāli spoke thus to the Lord: “Now, Lord, how many (kinds of) interruptions are there for a monk who is undergoing mānatta (discipline)?”

“There are four (kinds of) interruptions, Upāli, for a monk who is undergoing mānatta (discipline): dwelling with; dwelling away, separated from; not announcing; going about with less than a group.[3] These, Upāli, are the four (kinds of) interruptions for a monk who is undergoing mānatta (discipline).”


Kd.12.8.1 Now at that time a large Order of monks had gathered together at Sāvatthī; monks undergoing mānatta (discipline) were unable to carry through their mānatta (discipline) … see Kd.12.3.1, Kd.12.3.2mānatta (discipline) comes to be taken up.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

This is an extra clause peculiar to the monk undergoing mānatta.

2.

Instead of “a regular monk”, as in the other cases.

3.

ūne gaṇe caraṇaṃ, a gaṇa, group usually consisting of two, three or four monks. But Vin-a.1170 says: “here a gaṇa means four (monks) or more. Therefore, if he is staying with three monks, that itself is an interruption.”

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