Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

An act of suspension for not seeing an offence

Kd.11.25 Kd.11.25.1 At one time the Awakened One, the Lord was staying at Kosambī in Ghosita’s monastery. Now at that time the venerable Channa,[1] having fallen into an offence, did not want to see the offence.[2] Those who were modest monks looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “How can the venerable Channa, having fallen into an offence, not want to see the offence?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. Then the Lord, on this occasion, in this connection, having had the Order of monks convened, questioned the monks, saying: “Is it true, as is said, monks, that the monk Channa … did not want to see the offence?”

“It is true, Lord.” The Awakened One, the Lord rebuked them, saying:

“How, monks, can this foolish man, having fallen into an offence, not want to see the offence? It is not, monks, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased …” And having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

“Well then, monks, let the Order carry out a (formal) act of suspension[3] against the monk Channa for not seeing his offence, (and there should be) no eating with an Order.[4]

Kd.11.25.2 “And thus, monks, should it be carried out. First, the monk Channa should be reproved, having reproved him, he should be made to remember, having made him remember, he should be accused of the offence; having accused him of the offence, the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. BD.5.31 This monk Channa, having fallen into an offence, does not want to see the offence. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may carry out a (formal) act of suspension against the monk Channa for not seeing the offence (and there should be) no eating with an Order. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Channa, having fallen into an offence, does not want to see the offence. The Order is carrying out a (formal) act of suspension against the monk Channa for not seeing the offence (and there should be) no eating with an Order. If the carrying out by the Order of a (formal) act of suspension against the monk Channa for not seeing his offence (and with) no eating with an Order, is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter: Honoured sirs, … Vin.2.22 should speak. A (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence (and with) no eating with an Order, is carried out by the Order against the monk Channa. It is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’ And, monks, proclaim in residence after residence: ‘A (formal) act of suspension for not seeing an offence (and with) no eating with an Order has been carried out against the monk Channa.

Twelve on an act not by rule

Kd.11.26.1 “Monks, if a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing an offence is possessed of three qualities it comes to be a (formal) act not by rule … see Kd.11.2–Kd.11.4

Twelve on an act by rule

Not in Horner’s translation.

Six on desiring

… Monks, if an Order so desires, it may carry out a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing an offence against these three (kinds of) monks.”

Kd.11.26.2 Told are the Six Cases on Being Desirous in connection with a (Formal) Act of Suspension for Not Seeing an Offence.

Forty three duties

Kd.11.27.1 “Monks, a monk against whom a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence has been carried out should conduct himself properly. This is proper conduct in this case[5]: he should not ordain, he should not give guidance, a novice should not attend him, the agreement to exhort nuns should not be BD.5.32 consented to (by him), even if he is agreed upon nuns should not be exhorted by him, he should not fall into that same offence for which the (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence was carried out against him by an Order, nor into another that is similar, nor into one that is worse, he should not find fault with the (formal) act, he should not find fault with those who are carrying out the (formal) act, he should not consent to a regular monk’s greeting him, standing up before him, saluting him with joined palms, performing the proper duties, bringing forward a seat, bringing forward a sleeping-place, water for (washing) the feet, a footstool, a foot-stand, the receiving of bowl and robe, treating his back by massaging, he should not defame a regular monk with falling away from moral habit, he should not defame him with falling away from good habits, he should not defame him with falling away from (right) views, he should not defame him with falling away from a right mode of livelihood, he should not cause monk to break with monk, he should not wear a householder’s emblem, he should not wear an emblem of members of other sects,[6] he should not follow members of other sects, he should follow monks, he should train in the training for monks, he should not stay[7] in a residence under one roofing with a regular monk, he should not stay in what is not a residence[8] under one roofing (with him), he should not stay in a residence or in what is not a residence under one roofing (with him), having seen a regular monk he should get up from his seat, he should not upbraid a regular monk either inside or outside,[9] he should not suspend a regular monk’s Observance,[10] he should not suspend his Invitation, he should not issue commands, Vin.2.23 he should not set up authority, he should not ask for leave, he should not reprove, he should not make remember, he should not quarrel with monks.

Kd.11.27.2 Told are the Forty-Three Observances connected with a (Formal) act of Suspension for Not Seeing an Offence.

Kd.11.28.1 BD.5.33 Then the Order carried out a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence against the monk Channa (and with) no eating with an Order. He, when the (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence had been carried out against him by the Order, went from that residence to another residence; there the monks neither greeted him, nor stood up before him, nor saluted with joined palms, nor performed the proper duties, nor revered, respected, esteemed or honoured him.[11] He, not being revered, respected, esteemed or honoured by these monks, then went unrevered from that residence to another residence; there too the monks neither greeted him … he then went from that residence to another residence; there too the monks neither greeted him … he, unrevered, went back again to Kosambī. He conducted himself properly, he was subdued, he mended his ways; having approached monks, he spoke thus: “I, your reverences, against whom a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing an offence was carried out by an Order, am conducting myself properly, I am subdued, I am mending my ways. What line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks let the Order revoke the (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence against the monk Channa.

Forty-three cases that should not be revoked

Kd.11.28.2 “If, monks, a monk is possessed of five qualities, a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence should not be revoked: if he ordains, if he gives guidance, if a novice attends him, if he consents to the agreement to exhort nuns, if, although agreed upon, he exhorts nuns. Monks, if a monk is possessed of these five qualities … should not be revoked. And monks, if a monk is possessed of five further qualities … should not be revoked: if he falls into that same offence for which a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence was carried out against him by the Order, or into another that is similar, or into one that is worse, if he finds fault with a (formal) act, if he finds fault with those who carry out a (formal) act. Monks, if a monk is possessed of these five qualities … should not be revoked. And, monks, if a monk is possessed of five further qualities … should not be revoked: if he consents to a regular monk’s greeting him, standing up before BD.5.34 him, saluting with joined palms, doing the proper duties, bringing forward a seat. Monks, if a monk … should not be revoked. And, monks, if a monk is possessed of five further qualities … should not be revoked: Vin.2.24 if he consents to a regular monk’s bringing forward a sleeping-place, water for (washing) the feet, a footstool, a foot-stand, to receiving his bowl and robe, to treating his back by massaging. Monks, if a monk is possessed of these five qualities the (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence should not be revoked.

“And, monks, if a monk is possessed of five further qualities … should not be revoked: if he defames a regular monk with falling away from moral habit, if he defames him with falling away from good habits, if he defames him with falling away from (right) views, if he defames him with falling away from a (right) way of living, if he causes monk to break with monk. Monks, if a monk … should not be revoked. And, monks, if a monk is possessed of five further qualities … should not be revoked: if he wears a householder’s emblem, if he wears an emblem of other sects, if he follows members of other sects, if he does not follow monks, if he does not train in the training for monks. Monks, if a monk … should not be revoked. And, monks, if a monk is possessed of five further qualities … should not be revoked: if, in a residence, he stays under one roofing with a regular monk, if in what is not a residence he stays under one roofing with him, if in either a residence or in what is not a residence he stays under one roofing with him, if, having seen a regular monk, he does not get up from his seat, if he upbraids a regular monk either inside or outside. Monks, if a monk … should not be revoked. Monks, if a monk is possessed of eight qualities … should not be revoked: if he suspends a regular monk’s Observance, if he suspends his Invitation, if he issues commands, if he sets up authority, if he asks for leave, if he reproves, if he makes remember, if he quarrels with monks. Monks, if a monk is possessed of these eight qualities a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence should not be revoked.

Kd.11.28.3 Told are the Forty-three Cases (where a Formal Act of Suspension for Not Seeing an Offence should not be revoked).

Forty-three cases that should be revoked

Kd.11.29.1 BD.5.35 “Monks, it a monk is possessed of five qualities, a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence may be revoked: if he does not ordain … This Chapter is the exact opposite of Kd.11.28.2 … if he does not quarrel with monks. Monks, if a monk is possessed of these eight qualities a (formal) act of suspension for not seeing his offence may be revoked.

Kd.11.29.2 Told are the Forty-three Cases (where a Formal Act of Suspension for Not Seeing an Offence may be revoked).

Kd.11.30.1 “And thus, monks, should it be revoked: That monk Channa, having approached the Order … see Kd.12. Instead of act of censure read act of suspension for not seeing his offence … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’”

Told is the Fifth (Formal) Act: that of Suspension for Not Seeing an Offence. Vin.2.25

Footnotes and references:

1.

For further references, see BD.1.266, n.3.

3.

ukkhepaniyakamma. Cf. Kd.1.25.22, and Kd.9.7.9.

4.

asambhogaṃ saṅghena. Cf. Kd.1.79.2Kd.1.79.4. At Vin.4.138 it is an offence of expiation to eat with a monk who is suspended. Two kinds of sambhoga, eating food and eating dhamma, are defined at Vin.4.137 (BD.3.29). The monk in the above Cullavagga passage is not deprived of “being in communion”, saṃvāsa, with the other monks for not seeing his offence. Cf. below, Kd.15.20.3.

5.

This differs from the “proper conduct” of the other formal acts (Kd.11.5, Kd.11.10, Kd.11.15, Kd.11.21). Cf. Kd.22.1.2.

6.

Cf. Vin.1.306.

7.

Cf. below, Kd.12.1.4.

9.

Inside and outside a dwelling-place, according to Vin-a.1159.

10.

From here to the end of Kd.11.27.1 = Kd.11.5.1.

11.

As at Kd.10.5.1.

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