Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Kd.11.9.1 Now at that time the venerable Seyyasaka[1] was ignorant, BD.5.11 inexperienced, full of offences, not rid of them; he lived in company with householders, in unbecoming association with householders.[2] So much so that the monks were done up[3] with granting him probation, sending him back to the beginning, imposing mānatta, rehabilitating him.[4] Those who were modest monks looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “How can the venerable Seyyasaka, ignorant, inexperienced … rehabilitating him?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. Then the Lord, on this occasion, in this connection, having had the Order of monks convened, questioned the monks, saying: “Is it true, as is said, monks, that the monk Seyyasaka, ignorant, inexperienced … rehabilitating him?”

“It is true, Lord.” The Awakened One, the Lord, rebuked them, saying:

“It is not suitable, monks, it is not becoming in this foolish man, it is not fitting, it is not worthy of a recluse, it is not allowable, it is not to be done. For how, monks, can this foolish man, ignorant, inexperienced … rehabilitating him? It is not, monks, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased, nor for increasing the number of those who are pleased …” And having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying: Vin.2.8

“Well then, monks, let the Order carry out a (formal) act of guidance[5] for the monk Seyyasaka, saying: ‘You should live in dependence[6]’.

Kd.11.9.2 “And thus, monks, should it be carried out: First, the monk Seyyasaka should be reproved; having reproved him, he should be made to remember; having made him remember, he should be accused of the offence; having accused him of the offence, the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Seyyasaka, ignorant, inexperienced … BD.5.12 rehabilitating him. If it seems right to the Order, let the Order carry out a (formal) act of guidance for the monk Seyyasaka, saying: “You should live in dependence.” This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Seyyasaka, ignorant, inexperienced … rehabilitating him. The Order is carrying out a (formal) act of guidance for the monk Seyyasaka, saying: “You should live in dependence”. If the carrying out of the (formal) act of guidance, saying: “You should live in dependence”, for the monk Seyyasaka is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter … he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. A (formal) act of guidance, saying: “You should live in dependence,” is being carried out by the Order for the monk Seyyasaka. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.

Twelve on an act not by rule

Kd.11.10.1 “If a monk, monks, is possessed of three qualities … = Kd.11.2–Kd.11.5. Instead of (formal) act of censure, by carrying out a (formal) act of censure read (formal) act of guidance, by carrying out a (formal) act of guidance

Twelve on an act by rule

Note by Sujato: This and following sections, which consist of variations on the preceding, were omitted in Horner’s translation.

Six on desiring

Not in Horner’s translation.

Eighteen duties

… he should not quarrel with monks.”

Kd.11.10.2 Told are the Eighteen Observances connected with a (Formal) Act of Guidance.

Kd.11.11.1 Then the Order carried out a (formal) act of guidance for the monk Seyyasaka, saying: “You should live in dependence.” After the (formal) act of guidance had been carried out by the Order, he, choosing, associating with, visiting friends who were lovely[7] (in deed), making them recite, interrogating them, came to be one who had heard much,[8] one to whom the tradition was handed down; an expert in dhamma, an expert in discipline, an expert in the headings; experienced, wise, modest, scrupulous, desirous of the training; he conducted himself properly, was subdued, and mended his ways; and, having approached monks, he spoke thus: “I, your reverences, BD.5.13 for whom a (formal) act of guidance was carried out by the Order, am conducting myself properly, I am subdued and am mending my ways. What line of conduct should be followed by me? “They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order revoke the (formal) act of guidance for the monk Seyyasaka.

Eighteen cases that should not be revoked

Not in Horner’s translation.

Eighteen cases that should be revoked

Kd.11.11.2 “Monks, if a monk is possessed of five qualities Vin.2.9= Kd.11.6.2Kd.11.7.1 Instead of (formal) act of censure read (formal) act of guidance … may be revoked.

Kd.11.11.3 Told are the Eighteen Cases (where a Formal Act of Guidance) may be revoked.

Kd.11.12.1 “And thus, monks, should it be revoked. Monks, the monk Seyyasaka, having approached the Order, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having saluted the feet of the senior monks, having sat down on his haunches, having stretched forth his joined palms, should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, for whom a (formal) act of guidance was carried out by the Order, am conducting myself properly, I am subdued, I am mending my ways; I ask for the revocation of the (formal) act of guidance’. And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for.

Kd.11.12.2 “The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Seyyasaka, for whom a (formal) act of guidance was carried out by the Order, is conducting himself properly, he is subdued, he is mending his ways; he asks for the revocation of the (formal) act of guidance. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may revoke the (formal) act of guidance for the monk Seyyasaka. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Seyyasaka, for whom a (formal) act of guidance was carried out by the Order, is conducting himself properly, he is subdued, he is mending his ways; he asks for the revocation of the (formal) act of guidance. If the revocation of the (formal) act of guidance for the monk Seyyasaka is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The (formal) act of guidance BD.5.14 for the monk Seyyasaka is revoked by the Order. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Told is the Second (Formal) Act: that of Guidance.

Footnotes and references:

1.

At Vin.3.110ff. he is represented as committing the offence for which the first Saṅghādisesa was formulated.

2.

Cf. above, Kd.11.4.1.

3.

pakata, done away with; so, exhausted, worn out, “fed up.”

4.

As Vinaya Texts ii.343, n.1 indicates, it is not clear why a Saṅghādisesa should be attributed to Seyyasaka, but it suggests that the answer may appear at Vinaya Texts ii.384, n.1. The text may have in mind Vin.3.110 (see above, BD.5.10, n). Certainly there is a tradition connecting Seyyasaka with the Saṅghādisesa type of offence. There was for monks no recognised offence incurring a penalty if they lived in association with householders.

5.

nissayakamma. Cf. Kd.1.25.22; Kd.9.7.6, Kd.9.7.14.

6.

nissāya. Cf. BD.4.79, BD.4.100f.

7.

kalyāṇamitta; cf. Dhp.375. Or the word may be in the technical sense of a spiritual adviser, as at SN.v.3.