Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Kd.10.5.11 Then while that monk who had been suspended was reflecting on dhamma and discipline, it occurred to him: “This is an offence, this is not no offence, I have fallen, I am not unfallen, I am suspended, I am not unsuspended, I am suspended by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand.” Then the suspended monk approached those monks who were taking the part of the suspended (one); having approached, he spoke thus to those monks who were taking the part of the suspended (one): “This is an offence, your reverences, it is not no offence … fit to stand. Come, venerable ones, restore me.”

Kd.10.5.12 Then those monks who were taking the part of the suspended (one), taking that suspended monk (with them) approached the Lord; having approached, having greeted the Lord, they sat down at a respectful distance. As they were sitting down at a respectful distance, those monks spoke thus to the Lord: “Lord, this suspended monk speaks thus: ‘This is an offence, your reverences … Come, venerable ones, restore me’. What line of conduct, Lord, is to be followed in these circumstances?”[1]

“This, monks, is an offence, this is not no offence, this monk has fallen, this monk is not unfallen, this monk is suspended, this monk is not Vin.1.357 unsuspended, he was suspended by a legally valid (formal) act, irreversible, fit to stand But since, monks, that monk who has fallen and was suspended sees (his offence)—well then, monks, restore that monk.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

tehi.