Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On going to Pārileyyaka

Kd.10.4.6 Then the Lord, having delighted, rejoiced, roused, gladdened the venerable Anuruddha and the venerable Nandiya and the venerable Kimbila with talk on dhamma, rising from his seat, set out on tour for Pārileyya.[1] Walking on tour in due course he arrived at Pārileyya. The Lord stayed there at Pārileyya in the Guarded Woodland Thicket[2] at the root of the lovely sāl-tree.[3] Then as the Lord was meditating in private a reasoning arose in his mind thus: “Formerly, beset by those monks of Kosambī, makers of strife, makers of quarrels, makers of disputes, makers of brawls, makers of legal questions in the Order, I did not live in comfort; but now that I am alone with no other, I am living in comfort removed from BD.4.504 those monks, makers of strife … makers of legal questions in the Order.”

Now a certain large bull-elephant[4] was beset by elephants and cow-elephants, by elephant calves and sucklings; he ate grass already cropped by them, and they ate bundles of branches as he broke them off; and he drank muddied water and when he crossed over at a ford the cow-elephants went pushing against his body. Then Vin.1.353 it occurred to that large bull-elephant: “Now I am living beset by elephants and cow-elephants … I eat grass already cropped by them and they eat bundles of branches as I break them off; and I drink muddied water and when I cross over at a ford the cow-elephants go pushing against my body. Suppose I were to live alone secluded from the crowd?”

Kd.10.4.7 Then that large bull-elephant, leaving the herd, approached Pārileyya, the Guarded Woodland Thicket, the lovely sāl-tree and the Lord; having approached, he set out by means of his trunk drinking water for the Lord and water for washing, and he kept the grass down.[5] Then it occurred to that large bull-elephant: “Now formerly, beset by elephants and cow-elephants, by elephant calves and sucklings, I did not live in comfort; I ate grass already cropped by them and they ate bundles of branches as I broke them off; I drank muddied water and when I crossed over at a ford the cow-elephants went pushing against me; but now that I am alone with no other I am living in comfort removed from the elephants, the cow-elephants, the elephant calves and sucklings.”

Then the Lord, having understood his own seclusion and knowing by mind that bull-elephant’s reasoning of mind, at that time uttered this utterance:

“Herein agreeth mind with mind,
of sage[6]and bull-elephant of plough-pole tusks,[7]
since each delights in forest (solitude).”[8]


Kd.10.5.1 BD.4.505 Then the Lord, having stayed at Pārileyya as long as he found suiting, set out on tour for Sāvatthī. Walking on tour in due course he arrived at Sāvatthī. The Lord stayed there at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Then the lay-followers of Kosambī thought: ‘These masters the monks of Kosambī, have done us much mischief; the Lord is departing, harassed by these; come, we should neither greet the masters, the monks of Kosambī, nor should we stand up before them, nor should we salute them with joined palms or perform the proper duties; we should not revere, respect, esteem or honour them, and neither should we give them almsfood when they come (to us); thus they, when they are neither revered, respected, esteemed nor honoured by us, will depart unrevered, or they will leave the Order, or they will reconcile themselves to the Lord’.

Kd.10.5.2 Then the lay-followers of Kosambī neither greeted the monks of Kosambī, nor stood up before them, Vin.1.354 they did not salute them with joined palms or perform the proper duties, they did not revere, respect, esteem or honour them and they did not give them almsfood when they came (to them). Then the monks of Kosambī, as they were not being revered, respected, esteemed or honoured by the lay-followers of Kosambī, spoke thus: “Come now, your reverences, let us, having gone to Sāvatthī, settle this legal question in the Lord’s presence.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

Spelt Pārileyyaka; a village, although SN-a.ii.304 speaks of it as a nagara, town. Dhp-a.i.51–63 takes Pārileyyaka to be the and describes in vivid detail the ways in which he waited upon the Lord. This elephant is identified with that in the Bhisi Jātaka (Ja.iv.314). Pārileyya(ka) mentioned at SN.iii.95, Ud.iv.5, Ja.iiii.489.

2.

Rakkhitavanasaṇḍa. Mentioned at Ud.iv.5, but not at SN.iii.95.Dhp-a.i.59 says that the thicket was so called because the elephant with a stick in his trunk, guarded the Lord from danger during the nights.

3.

bhaddasāla. It was one tree,manāpa laṭṭhaka, according to Ud-a.250 and SN-a.ii.305, which say that the Lord stayed depending on that village (Pārileyya) in a leaf-room in the jungle thicket at the root of that tree.

4.

hatthināga. Vin-a.1152 says mahāhatthi, a great elephant. Ud-a.250 adds that he was the leader of a herd. This passage recurs at Ud.iv.5. Cf. AN.iv.435.

5.

appaharitañ ca karoti.

6.

nāga. Vin-a.1152, Ud-a.251 explain by buddhanāga.

7.

Cf. nāga īsādanta at MN.i.414, Vv.20.9, Vv.43.9.

8.

Version at Ud.iv.5 also ends here.

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