Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On an act without a motion, etc.

Kd.9.3.1 Now at that time the group of six monks carried out (formal) acts like these: they carried out a (formal) act not by rule in an incomplete assembly; they carried out a (formal) act not by rule in a complete assembly; they carried out a (formal) act by rule in an incomplete assembly; they carried out a (formal) act by what had the appearance of a rule in an incomplete assembly; they carried out a (formal) act by what had the appearance of a rule in a complete assembly; they also carried out a (formal) act for which a motion had not been BD.4.453 furnished[1] although a proclamation had been furnished;[2] they also carried out a (formal) act for which a proclamation had not been furnished although a motion had been furnished; Vin.1.317 they also carried out a (formal) act for which a motion had not been furnished and for which a proclamation had not been furnished; they also carried out a (formal) act that was against the rule; they also carried out a (formal) act that was against discipline;[3] they also carried out a (formal) act that was against the Teacher’s instruction;[4] they also carried out a (formal) act that had been protested against,[5] that was not legitimate, reversible, not fit to stand. Those who were modest monks looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying:

“How can this group of six monks carry out (formal) acts like these? How can they carry out a (formal) act not by rule in an incomplete assembly? … How can they carry out a (formal) act that has been protested against, that is not legitimate,[6] reversible, not fit to stand?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Is it true, as is said, monks, that the group of six monks carried out (formal) acts like these; that they carried out a (formal) act not by rule, in an incomplete assembly … a (formal) act that has been protested against, that is not legitimate, reversible, not fit to stand?”

“It is true, Lord.” … Having rebuked them, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Kd.9.3.2 “Monks, a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule, in an incomplete assembly, is not a (formal) act and ought not to be carried out … A (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of a rule in a complete assembly is not a (formal) act and ought not to be carried out. Monks, a (formal) act for which a motion is not furnished, although a proclamation BD.4.454 is furnished, is not a (formal) act and ought not to be carried out. Monks, a (formal) act for which a proclamation is furnished, although a motion is not furnished, is not a (formal) act and ought not to be carried out. Monks, a (formal) act for which a motion is not furnished and for which a proclamation is not furnished, is not a (formal) act and ought not to be carried out. Monks, a (formal) act carried out against the rule … against the discipline … against the Teacher’s instruction is not a (formal) act and ought not to be carried out. Monks, a (formal) act that has been protested against, that is not legitimate, reversible, not fit to stand, is not a (formal) act and ought not to be carried out.

Kd.9.3.3 “Monks, there are these six (formal) acts: a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule, a (formal) act (carried out) in an incomplete assembly, a (formal) act (carried out) in a complete assembly, a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule in an incomplete assembly, a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule in a complete assembly, a (formal) act (carried out) by rule in a complete assembly.

“And what, monks, is a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule? If, monks, when it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution,[7] one carries out the (formal) act by means of the one motion but does not proclaim the resolution, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule. If, monks, when it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, one carries out the (formal) act by means of two motions but does not proclaim the resolution, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule. If, monks, when it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, one carries out the (formal) act by means of the one resolution but does not propose the motion, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule. If, monks, when it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, one carries out the (formal) act by means of two resolutions but does not propose the motion, it is a (formal) act carried out not by rule.

Kd.9.3.4 “If, monks, when it is a (formal) act with a motion and BD.4.455 a resolution to be put three times,[8] one carries out the (formal) act by means of one motion but does not proclaim the resolution Vin.1.318 , then it is a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule. If monks, when it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution to be put three times, one carries out the (formal) act by means of two motions … three motions … four motions but does not proclaim the resolution, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule. If, monks, when it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution io be put three times, one carries out the (formal) act by means of one proclamation … two proclamations … three proclamations … four proclamations, but does not propose the motion, then it is a (formal) act carried out not by rule. This, monks, is called a (formal) act (carried out) not by rule.

Kd.9.3.5 “And what, monks, is a (formal) act (carried out) in an incomplete assembly? If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, and as many monks as are entitled (to take part in the formal) act[9] are not come, if the leave for absence of those fit (to declare their) leave of absence is not sent, if those who are present protest, it is a (formal) act in an incomplete assembly. If, monks, … as many monks as are entitled (to take part in the formal) act are come, if the leave for absence … is not sent, if those who are present protest, it is a (formal) act in an incomplete assembly. If, monks, … as many monks as are entitled (to take part in the formal) act are come, if the leave for absence of those fit (to declare their) leave for absence is sent, if those who are present protest, it is a (formal) act (carried out) in an incomplete assembly.

“If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution put three times … the same three cases as above are repeated here … it is a (formal) act in an incomplete assembly. This, monks, is called a (formal) act (carried out) in an incomplete assembly.

Kd.9.3.6 “And what, monks, is a (formal) act (carried out) in a complete assembly? If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a BD.4.456 motion and a resolution, and as many monks as are (entitled to take part in the formal) act are come, if the leave for absence of those fit (to declare their) leave for absence is sent, if those who are present do not protest, it is a (formal) act (carried out) in a complete assembly.

“If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution to be put three times … the same three cases as above are repeated here … it is a (formal) act (carried out) in a complete assembly. This, monks, is called a (formal) act (carried out) in a complete assembly.

Kd.9.3.7 “And what, monks, is a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule, in an incomplete assembly? If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, and one first proclaims the resolution and afterwards proposes the motion, if as many monks as are entitled (to take part in a formal) act have not come, if the leave for absence of those fit (to declare their) leave for absence is not sent, if those who are present protest, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule, in an incomplete assembly.

“If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, and one first proclaims the resolution and afterwards proposes the motion, if as many monks as are entitled (to take part in the formal) act have come, if the leave of absence … is not sent, if those who are present protest, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule, in an incomplete assembly.

“If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, and one first proclaims the resolution and afterwards proposes the motion, if as many monks as are entitled (to take part in the formal) act have come, if the leave for absence of those (fit to declare) leave for absence is sent Vin.1.319 , if those who are present protest, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule, in an incomplete assembly.

“If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution to be put three times … the same three cases as above are repeated here … This, monks, is called a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule, in an incomplete assembly.

Kd.9.3.8 “And what, monks, is a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule, in a complete assembly? If, monks, BD.4.457 it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, and one first proclaims the resolution and afterwards proposes the motion, if as many monks as are entitled (to take part in the formal) act have come, if the leave of absence of those fit (to declare their) leave of absence is sent, if those who are present do not protest, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule, in a complete assembly.

“If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution to be put three times … the same as above is repeated here … it is a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of the rule in a complete assembly. This, monks, is called a (formal) act (carried out) by what has the appearance of rule in a complete assembly.

Kd.9.3.9 “And what, monks, is a (formal) act (carried out) by rule in a complete assembly? If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution, and if one first proposes the motion and after one resolution carries out the (formal) act, if as many monks are entitled (to take part in the formal) act have come, if the leave of absence of those fit (to declare their) leave of absence is sent, if those who are present do not protest, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) by rule in a complete assembly.

“If, monks, it is a (formal) act with a motion and a resolution to be put three times, and if one first proposes the motion and after (having put) the resolution three times, carries out the (formal) act, if as many monks as are entitled (to take part in the formal) act have come, if the leave of absence of those who are fit (to declare their) leave of absence is sent, if those who are present do not protest, then it is a (formal) act (carried out) by rule, in a complete assembly. This, monks, is called a (formal) act (carried out) by rule, in a complete assembly.[10]

Footnotes and references:

1.

ñattivipanna.

2.

anussāvanasampanna, i.e. a proclamation of a kammavācā, the resolution. See SN.Dutt, Early Buddhist Monachism, p.150.

3.

Vin-a.1146 says that discipline here means “reproving, making (someone) remember”, i.e. giving the person against whom one is about to carry out a formal act a chance to confess his offence.

4.

Vin-a.1146 says that this provides for a motion and a proclamation.

5.

paṭikuṭṭhakata. Vin-a.1146 says that it was protested against (paṭikuṭṭha) but was also carried out (kata)—it was carried out in spite of the protests of others. See paṭikkosati at beginning of Bu-Pc.79, where the monks protest when a formal act is being carried out.

6.

Omitted in Oldenberg’s text, but contained in the Sinhalese edition.

7.

ñattidutiya. This is a formal act in two parts, the motion, ñatti, being the first; the second part, dutiya, which consists of one proclamation, has to be made before the decision of an Order can be arrived at.

8.

ñatticatuttha, a formal act in four parts: the motion, and then the resolution, but this has to be proclaimed not once, but three times, have no neat expressions for such procedure.

9.

kammappatta.

10.

Oldenberg’s edition omits this last sentence. It is contained, rightly, in the Sinhalese edition.

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