Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On rightly and wrongly allotted

Kd.8.31.1 Now at that time the venerable Revata sent robe-material for the venerable Sāriputta by the hand of a certain monk, saying: “Give this robe-material to the elder.” Then on the way that monk took that robe-material on trust[1] for the venerable Revata. Then the venerable Revata, having met the venerable Sāriputta, asked:

“I, honoured sir, sent robe-material for the elder. Has that robe-material arrived?” “I have not seen that robe-material, your reverence.” Then the venerable Revata spoke thus to that monk: “I, your reverence, sent robe-material by the venerable one’s hand for the elder. Where is that robe-material?”

“I, honoured sir, took that robe-material on trust for the venerable one.” They told this matter to the Lord.

Kd.8.31.2 He said: “This is a case, monks, where a monk is sending robe-material by a monk’s hand, saying: ‘Give this robe-material to so and so.’ If he, while on the way, takes it on trust for him who sends it, it is rightly taken. If he takes it on trust for him to whom it was being sent, it is wrongly taken. This is a case, monks, where a monk is sending robe-material by a monk’s hand, saying, ‘Give this robe-material to so and so’. If he, while on the way, takes it on trust for him to whom BD.4.442 it was being sent, it is wrongly taken. If he takes it on trust for him who sent it, it is rightly taken. This is a case, monks, where a monk … ‘… to so and so’. While he is on the way he hears that he who sent it has passed away. If he allots to him[2] the robe-material of the one who is deceased, it is rightly allotted. If he takes it on trust for him to whom it was being sent, it is wrongly taken. This is a case, monks, where a monk … ‘… to so and so’. While he is on the way he hears that he to whom it was being sent has passed away. If he allots to him the robe-material of the one who is deceased, it is wrongly allotted. If he takes it on trust for him who sent it, it is rightly taken. This is a case, monks, where a a monk … ‘… to so and so’. Vin.1.309 While he is on the way he hears that both have passed away. If he allots to him the robe-material of the one who is deceased—of him who sent it—it is rightly allotted. If he allots to him the robe-material of the one who is deceased—of him to whom it was being sent—it is wrongly allotted.

Kd.8.31.3 “This is a case, monks, where a monk sends robe-material by the hand of a monk, saying, ‘I am giving this robe-material to so and so’. If he, while on the way, takes it on trust for him who sends it, it is wrongly taken. If he takes it on trust for him to whom it is being sent, it is rightly taken. This is a case, monks, where a monk … ‘… to so and so’. If he, while on the way, takes it on trust for him to whom it was being sent, it is rightly taken. If he takes it on trust for him who sends it, it is wrongly taken. This is a case, monks, where a monk … ‘… to so and so’. While he is on the way, he hears that he who sent it has passed away. If he allots to him the robe-material of the one who is deceased, it is wrongly allotted. If he takes it on trust for him to whom it was being sent, it is rightly taken. This is a case, monks, where a monk … ‘… to so and so’. While he is on the way, he hears that he to whom it was being sent has passed away. If he allots to him the robe-material of the one who is deceased, it is rightly allotted. If he takes it on trust for him who sent it, it is wrongly taken. This is a case, monks, where a monk … ‘… to so and so’. While he is on the BD.4.443 way, he hears that both have passed away. If he allots to him the robe-material of the one who is deceased—of him who sent it—it is wrongly allotted. If he allots to him the robe-material of the one who is deceased—of him to whom it was being sent—it is rightly allotted.”[3]

Footnotes and references:

1.

I.e. he used it himself. On vissāsaṃ gaṇhāti, see Kd.8.19.1 and BD.2.10, n.5.

2.

tassa.

3.

Vinaya Texts ii.253, n.1 says “The reason of all this is, that if the sender (A) says to the messenger (B), ‘Give this robe to the sendee (C)’, the property in the robe does not pass; if A says to B, ‘I give this robe to C’, it does pass.”