Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On an agreement for the receiver of cloth

Kd.8.5.1 Now at that time people, taking robe-material, came to a monastery; these, not finding an accepter,[1] conveyed it back; little robe-material accrued. They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

I allow you, monks, to agree upon a monk endowed with BD.4.401 five qualities as accepter of robe-material[2]: one who would not follow a wrong course through partiality, one who would not follow a wrong course through hatred, one who would not follow a wrong course through stupidity, one who would not follow a wrong course through fear, and one who would know what is taken and what is not taken.[3]

Kd.8.5.2 “And thus, monks, should he be agreed upon. First, a monk is to be requested. Having requested (him), the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. If it seems right to the Order, the Order should agree upon the monk so and so as accepter of robe-material. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The Order is agreeing upon the monk so and so as accepter of robe-material. If the agreement upon the monk so and so as accepter of robe-material is pleasing to the venerable ones, let them be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. The monk so and so is agreed upon by the Order as accepter of robe-material. It is pleasing to the Order; therefore they are silent. Thus do I understand this’.”


Kd.8.6.1 Now at that time the monks who were accepters of robe-material, having accepted robe-material, leaving it just there, went away; the robe-material was lost. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, Vin.1.284 monks, to agree upon a monk endowed with five qualities as keeper of robe-material[4]: one who would not follow a wrong course through partiality … one who would not follow a wrong course through fear, and one who would know what is laid by and what is not laid by.[5]

Kd.8.6.2 “And thus, monks, should he be agreed upon …” as in BD.4.402 Kd.8.5.2 reading keeper of robe-material instead of accepter of robe-material.

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

paṭiggāhaka, or distributor.

[2]:

At Vin.2.176 it is said that at that time there was no accepter of robe-material, cīvarapaṭiggāhaka. One is to be agreed upon by the monks in precisely the same way as above, which was indeed the regular manner for appointing all the functionaries of the Older. Vin-a.1120 says that the cīvarapaṭiggāhaka takes the robe-material which is being given to the Order by the householders. Cf. AN.iii.274.

[3]:

For gahitāgahita. cf. Vin.2.167, Vin.2.176, Vin.3.246.

[4]:

cīvaranidāhaka, the one who lays aside or puts away the robe-material, until it is wanted.

[5]:

nihitānihita.

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