Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Allowance for five dairy products, etc.

Kd.6.34.17 Then the Lord, having stayed at Bhaddiya for as long as he found suiting, without asking the householder Meṇḍaka (for permission)[1] set out on tour for Aṅguttarāpa[2] together with the large Order of monks, with the twelve hundred and fifty monks. Then Meṇḍaka the householder heard: “They say that the Lord is setting out on tour for Aṅguttarāpa together with a large Order of monks, with twelve hundred and fifty monks.” Then Meṇḍaka the householder enjoined slaves and workmen saying: “Well now, my good men, having loaded much salt and oil and husked rice and solid food into wagons,[3] come along, and let there come along twelve hundred and fifty cowherds bringing twelve hundred and fifty milch cows. Wherever we see the Lord there will we offer him fresh milk.”

Kd.6.34.18 BD.4.335 Then Meṇḍaka Vin.1.244 the householder met the Lord on a wilderness road. Then Meṇḍaka the householder approached the Lord; having approached, having greeted the Lord, he stood at a respectful distance. As he was standing at a respectful distance, Meṇḍaka the householder spoke thus to the Lord: “Lord, may the Lord consent to a meal with me on the morrow together with the Order of monks.” The Lord consented by becoming silent. Then Meṇḍaka the householder, having understood the Lord’s consent, having greeted the Lord, departed keeping his right side towards him. Then Meṇḍaka the householder, towards the end of that night having had sumptuous food, solid and soft, prepared, had the time announced to the Lord, saying: “It is time, Lord, the meal is ready.”

Kd.6.34.19 Then the Lord, having dressed in the morning, taking his bowl and robe, approached the food distribution of Meṇḍaka the householder; having approached he sat down on the appointed seat together with the Order of monks. Then Meṇḍaka the householder enjoined the twelve hundred and fifty cowherds, saying: “Well now, my good men, let each one (of you) having each taken a milch cow, look after a monk, and we will offer them fresh milk.” Then Meṇḍaka the householder with his own hand served and satisfied the Order of monks with the awakened one at its head with sumptuous food, solid and soft, and (offered[4] them) fresh milk. The monks, being scrupulous, did not accept the milk. (The Lord said:) “Accept it, monks, make use of it.”

Kd.6.34.20 Then Meṇḍaka the householder, having with his own hand served and satisfied the Order of monks with the enlightened one at its head with sumptuous food, solid and soft and with fresh milk, when the Lord had eaten and had withdrawn his hand from his bowl, sat down at a respectful distance. As he was sitting down at a respectful distance Meṇḍaka the householder spoke thus to the Lord:

“There are, Lord, wilderness roads with little water, with BD.4.336 little food[5]; it is not easy to go along them without provisions for the journey.[6] It were good, Lord, if the Lord allowed monks provisions for the journey.” Then the Lord, having gladdened, rejoiced, roused, delighted the householder Meṇḍaka with talk on dhamma, rising from his seat, departed.

Kd.6.34.21 Then the Lord on this occasion, having given reasoned talk, addressed the monks, saying: “I allow you, monks, five products of the cow: milk, curds, butter-milk, butter, ghee. There are, monks, wilderness roads with little water, with little food; it is not easy to go along them without provisions for the journey. I allow you, monks, to look about for provisions for a journey: husked rice for him who has need of husked rice; kidney-beans for him who has need of kidney-beans; beans for him who has need of beans; salt for him who has need of salt; Vin.1.245 sugar for him who has need of sugar; oil for him who has need of oil; ghee for him who has need of ghee. There are, monks, people who have faith and are believing; these deposit gold (coins)[7] in the hands of those who make things allowable,[8]saying: ‘By means of this give the master that which is allowable.’ I allow you, monks, thereupon[9] to consent to that which is allowable. But this, monks, I do not say: that by any method[10] may gold and silver[11] be consented to, may be looked about for.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

anāpucchā, not asking (for permission) is defined, at Vin.4.343, by anapaloketvā, not having obtained permission, while this is defined at Vin.4.226, Vin.4.232, Vin.4.316 by anāpucchā.

2.

An Aṅga country north of the river Mahī (MN-a.iii.34, Snp-a.437). Mentioned at Snp.p.102, MN.i.359, MN.i.447, Dhp-a.iii.363.

4.

I think this verb, bhojeti (literally to make to eat, to feed, so to offer, to regale, to entertain with), which Meṇḍaka has already used, should be inserted here. For the monks refused the milk until told, as recorded, to accept it. So long as they refused it, it cannot be said that they were “served and satisfied with” it.

5.

To these kinds of wilds, kantāra, three others are added at Ja.i.99 (which gives a short explanation of each), SN-a.ii.103: cora°, vāḷa°, amanussa°. See BD.1.147, n.1.

6.

As at Vin.1.270. Cf. Vin.4.79f.

7.

hirañña, see BD.1.28, n.

8.

kappiyakāraka, see Kd.6.17.8.

9.

tato.

10.

pariyāya, perhaps here “in any circumstances”.

11.

jātarūparajata. See BD.1.28, n.; BD.2.100, n.2, BD.2.102, n.1. If a monk takes gold and silver or gets another to do so for him or consents to its being kept in deposit for him, he incurs a Nissaggiya offence (No.18).

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