Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Picked up and received

Kd.6.17.8 Now at that time several monks, having spent the rains in Kāsi, going to Rājagaha to see the Lord, did not obtain on the way sufficient mediocre or fine meals, as much as they needed. Yet there was much solid food that was fruit,[1] but there was no one to make it allowable.[2] So these monks weary in body, approached Rājagaha, the Bamboo Grove, the squirrels’ feeding place, the Lord; having approached, having greeted the Lord, they sat down at a respectful distance. Now it is the custom for awakened ones, for Lords, to exchange friendly greetings with incoming monks. So the Lord spoke thus to these monks: “I hope, monks, things are going well with you, I hope you are keeping going, I hope you have come here with but little fatigue on the journey? And where, monks, do you come from?”

Kd.6.17.9 “Things are going well with us, Lord, but we, Lord, having spent the rains in Kāsi, coming to Rājagaha to see the Lord … no one to make it allowable; thus we have come on the journey weary in body.”

Then the Lord on this occasion having given reasoned talk, addressed the monks, saying:

I allow you, monks, if one anywhere sees solid food that is fruit, but if there is no one to make it allowable, having taken[3] it oneself, having carried it away, having seen someone to make it allowable, having laid it down on the ground, to make use of it, (he) having (formally) offered[4] it to you. I allow you, monks, to receive (formally) what you have picked up.[5]


Kd.6.18.1 Now at that time fresh sesamum and fresh honey had accrued to a certain brahmin. Then it occurred to that brahmin: “Suppose I were to give the fresh sesamum and fresh honey to the Order of monks with the awakened one at its head?”

BD.4.290 Then that brahmin approached the Lord; having approached, he exchanged friendly greetings with the Lord. Having exchanged greetings of friendliness and courtesy he stood at a respectful distance; and standing at a respectful distance, that brahmin spoke thus to the Lord:

“Lord, may the revered[6] Gotama together with the Order of monks consent to a meal with me to-morrow.” The Lord consented Vin.1.213 by becoming silent. Then that brahmin departed, having understood the Lord’s consent.

Kd.6.18.2 Then that brahmin having had, towards the end of that night, sumptuous solid food and soft food prepared, had the time announced to the Lord, saying: “It is time, good Gotama, the meal is ready”. Then the Lord, having dressed in the morning, taking his bowl and robe, approached that brahmin’s dwelling; having approached, he sat down together with the Order of monks on the appointed seat. Then that brahmin, having with his own hand served and satisfied with sumptuous solid food and soft food the Order of monks with the awakened one at its head, sat down at a respectful distance when the Lord had eaten and had withdrawn his hand from his bowl. While that brahmin was sitting down at a respectful distance the Lord, having gladdened, rejoiced, roused, delighted him with talk on dhamma, rising from his seat, departed.

Kd.6.18.3 Then it occurred to that brahmin soon after the Lord had departed: “I forgot to give those things for the sake of which I invited the Order of monks with the awakened one at its head, thinking: ‘I will give fresh sesamum and fresh honey.’ Suppose I were to have the fresh sesamum and the fresh honey conveyed to the monastery in pots and pitchers?” Then that brahmin, having had the fresh sesamum and the fresh honey conveyed to the monastery in pots and pitchers, approached the Lord; having approached, he stood at a respectful distance; and as he was standing at a respectful distance this brahmin spoke thus to the Lord:

Kd.6.18.4 “I forgot to give those things, good Gotama, for the sake of which I invited the Order of monks with the awakened one at its head, thinking: ‘I will give fresh sesamum and fresh BD.4.291 honey’. May the revered Gotama accept from me fresh sesamum and fresh honey?”

“Well, then, brahmin, give them to the monks.”


Now at that time because food was scarce[7] and they offered them only a little, monks considerately refused. But a whole Order was offered (food); the monks, being scrupulous, did not accept it.[8] (The Lord said:)

“Accept (the food), monks, make use of it. I allow you, monks, having eaten and being satisfied,[9] to make use of food that is not left over,[10] if it was taken back from there”.[11]

Footnotes and references:

1.

phalakhādaniya. See note on piṭṭhakhādaniya at Kd.6.36.6 below.

2.

kappiyakāraka. These make things allowable by offering them. See Kd.6.21.1; Kd.6.38.1.

3.

gahetvā.

4.

paṭiggahāpetvā. Cf. note on patta-gāhāpaka at BD.2.122, and above, BD.4.280.

5.

uggahitaṃ. This is an “allowance” only for a time of scarcity. See the much simpler “allowance” at Kd.6.21.1 for more normal times.

6.

bhavaṃ, as at Vin.3.2.

7.

dubbhikkhā means scarcity of food and of (in consequence) almsfood.

8.

See Bu-Pc.32 and its definition of “great scarcity”, and its saying that at such a time a “group-meal” may be eaten (BD.2.312).

9.

See BD.2.326, n.2 and definitions at BD.2.328.

10.

See Bu-Pc.35, to which the above allowance is an exception made in a time of scarcity. See BD.2.328, n.4, and definition of “what is not left over” at BD.2.329.

11.

tato ṅīhataṃ, i.e. having taken the food to the monastery from the place where it was received. Cf. tato nīharitvā at Vin.4.80 and its “definition” at Vin.4.81.