Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Basis for a grave offence, etc.

Kd.4.16.19 “This is a case, monks, where a monk comes to have committed a grave offence on an Invitation day. Some monks view it as a grave offence, other monks view it as an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. Monks, those monks who view it as a grave offence, having led that monk to one side, having had him dealt with according to the rule, having approached the Order, should speak to it thus: ‘Your reverences, the monk who has fallen into that offence has made amends for it according to rule. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may invite.’

Kd.4.16.20 “This is a case, monks, where a monk comes to have committed a grave offence on an Invitation day. Some monks view it as a grave offence, other monks view it as an offence of expiation. Some Vin.1.174 monks view it as a grave offence, other monks view it as an offence which ought to be confessed. Some monks view it as a grave offence, other monks view it as an offence of wrong-doing. Some monks view it as a grave offence, other monks view it as an offence of wrong speech. Monks, those monks who view it as a grave offence … = Kd.4.16.19 ‘… the Order may invite’.

Kd.4.16.21 “This is a case, monks, where a monk comes to have BD.4.229 committed an offence of expiation on an Invitation day … an offence which ought to be confessed … an offence of wrong-doing … an offence of wrong speech. Some monks view it as an offence of wrong speech, other monks view it as an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. Monks, those monks who view it as an offence of wrong speech … = Kd.4.16.19 ‘… the Order may invite’.

Kd.4.16.22 “This is a case, monks, where a monk comes to have committed an offence of wrong speech on an Invitation day. Some monks view it as an offence of wrong speech, other monks view it as a grave offence; some monks … as an offence of wrong speech, other monks … of expiation; some monks … offence of wrong speech, other monks … which ought to be confessed; some monks view it as an offence of wrong speech, other monks view it as an offence of wrong-doing. Monks, those monks who view it as an offence of wrong speech … = Kd.4.16.19) ‘… the Order may invite’.

Kd.4.16.23 “This is a case, monks, where if on an Invitation day a monk should speak in the midst of the Order, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This matter is known but not the individual[1]’. If it seems right to the Order, the Order, having set aside the matter, may invite[2]’, and he should be spoken to thus: ‘Your reverence, Invitation is laid down by the Lord for those who are pure. If the matter is known but not the individual, speak about that now at once.’

Kd.4.16.24 “This is a case, monks, where if on an Invitation day a monk should speak in the midst of the Order, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This individual is known but not the matter. If it seems right to the Order, the Order, having set aside the individual, may invite; and he should be spoken to thus: ‘Your reverence, Invitation is laid down by the Lord for those who are complete.[3] If the individual is known but not the matter, speak about that now at once.’

Kd.4.16.25 “This is a case, monks, … ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This matter is known and the individual. If BD.4.230 it seems right to the Order, the Order, having set aside the matter and the individual, may invite’, and he should be spoken to thus: ‘Your reverence, Invitation is laid down by the Lord for the pure and for those who are complete. If the matter is known and also the individual, speak about that now at once.’

Kd.4.16.26 “If, monks, the matter is known before an Invitation day, the individual afterwards, it is right to say so. If, monks, Vin.1.175 the individual is known before an Invitation day, the matter afterwards, it is right to say so. If, monks, both the matter and the individual are known before an Invitation day, and (a monk) opens up (the cases) after the Invitation is finished, there is an offence of expiation for opening up.”[4]

Footnotes and references:

1.

I.e., the person who committed the offence or “matter”, vatthu.

2.

Vin-a.1078 says “when we know the person, then we will reprove him, but let the Order invite now”.

3.

A complete Order.

4.

See Bu-Pc.63, where, it is an offence to open up for further discussion a matter already settled.

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