Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Invitation with two statements, etc.

Kd.4.15.1 BD.4.221 Now at that time in a certain residence in the Kosala country there came to be a menace from savages on an Invitation day.[1] The monks were unable to invite by using the threefold formula.[2] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to invite by using a two-fold formula.” The menace from the savages became even greater. The monks were unable to invite by using the two-fold formula. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to invite by using a onefold formula.” The menace from the savages became even greater. The monks were unable to invite by using the onefold formula. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to invite those who keep the rains (all) together.


Kd.4.15.2 Now at that time in a certain residence people were giving gifts on an Invitation day until the night was almost ended. Then it occurred to those monks: “People are giving gifts until the night is almost ended. If the Order invites by the threefold formula, then the Order will not be invited before dawn breaks. Now what line of conduct should be followed by us?” They told this matter to the Lord.

Kd.4.15.3 He said: “This is a case, monks, … as in Kd.4.15.2 … before dawn breaks’. The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. People Vin.1.169 are giving gifts until the night is almost ended. If the Order invites by the threefold formula, then the Order will not be invited before dawn breaks. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may invite those who keep the rains together by a twofold formula, by a onefold formula.

Kd.4.15.4 “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence on an Invitation day monks are speaking dhamma, those versed in the discourses are chanting a discourse, the discipline experts are propounding discipline, the talkers on dhamma are discussing dhamma, monks are quarrelling[3] until the night is almost BD.4.222 ended. If it then occurs to these monks: ‘Monks are quarrelling until the night is almost ended. If the Order invites by the threefold formula, then the Order will not be invited before dawn breaks’, the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. Monks are quarrelling … the Order will not be invited before dawn breaks. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may invite those who keep the rains together by a twofold formula, by a onefold formula.’”


Kd.4.15.5 Now at that time in a certain residence in the Kosala country a large Order of monks came to have collected together on an Invitation day, and (only) a small (place) was sheltered from the rain and a great cloud had come up. Then it occurred to these monks: “Now this large Order of monks has collected together, and (only) a small (place) is sheltered from the rain and a great cloud has come up. If the Order invites by the threefold formula, then the Order will not be invited before this cloud pours down rain. Now what line of conduct should be followed by us?” They told this matter to the Lord.

Kd.4.15.6 He said: “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence a large Order of monks has collected together on an Invitation day, and (only) a small (place) … as in Kd.4.15.5 above … If it then occurs to these monks: ‘Now this large Order of monks … pours down rain’, the Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This large Order of monks … pours down rain. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may invite those who keep the rains together by a twofold formula, by a onefold formula.

Kd.4.15.7 “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence on an Invitation day there comes to be a danger from kings … from thieves … from fire … from water … from human beings … from non-human beings … from beasts of prey … from creeping things … to life … to the Brahma-faring.[4] It then occurs to these monks: ‘Now this is Vin.1.170 a danger to the Brahma-faring. If the Order invites by the threefold formula, then the Order will not be invited before there is a danger to the Brahma-faring.’ The Order should be informed by an BD.4.223 experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This is a danger to the Brahma-faring. If the Order invites by the threefold formula, then the Order will not be invited before there is a danger to the Brahma-faring. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may invite those who keep the rains together by a twofold formula, by a onefold formula.’

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. Kd.2.15.3.

2.

See Kd.4.1.14. As Buddhaghosa at Vin-a.1077 seems to imply the motion (ñatti) could be shelved if the Order approves. Then the inviting monk had merely three times to repeat his request to invite the Order. Above, he is allowed to curtail the number of times he makes the request. Cf. dvevācika and tevācika above Kd.1.4.5, Kd.1.7.10.

3.

“Quarrelling” really means arguing and disputing about points of dhamma and discipline.

4.

Cf. above BD.4.148.