Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Fifty cases of perceiving it is a group or is not a group

Kd.4.8.1 “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence several resident monks, five or more, collect together on an Invitation day.[1] They know that other resident monks have not arrived. Thinking of the rule, thinking of discipline, thinking that they are incomplete they invite while they are incomplete. While they are inviting, other resident monks, a larger number, arrive. Monks, these monks should invite again, and there is an offence of wrong-doing for those who have invited.

Kd.4.8.2 “This is a case, monks, … Vin.1.166 … a like number … a smaller number, arrive. Those who have invited have duly invited; the remainder should invite and there is an offence of wrong-doing for those who have invited.

Kd.4.8.3 “This is a case, monks, … When they have just finished inviting … and the assembly has not risen … part of the assembly has risen … the whole assembly has risen, and other BD.4.219 resident monks, a larger number … a like number … a smaller number, arrive. Those who have invited have duly invited; they should invite in their presence, and there is an offence of wrong-doing for those who have invited.

Kd.4.8.4 Told are the Fifteen Cases on being Aware that an Assembly is incomplete when it is incomplete.

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. Kd.2.29.

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