Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Procedure for no obstacle from offence

Kd.4.6.2 BD.4.217 Now at that time a certain monk, as he was himself inviting, remembered an offence.[1] Then it occurred to this monk: “It is laid down by the Lord that an offender should not invite, and I have fallen into an offence. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “This is a case, monks, where a monk, as he is himself inviting, remembers an offence. Monks, this monk should speak thus to the monk next to him: ‘I, your reverence, have fallen into such and such an offence; removing from here,[2] I will make amends for that offence.’ When he has spoken thus, he may invite, but no obstacle should be put in the way of the Invitation from such a cause.

Kd.4.6.3 “This is a case, monks, where a monk as he is himself inviting, becomes doubtful about an offence. Monks … cf. Kd.2.27.5[3] … When he has spoken thus he may invite, but no obstacle should be put in the way of the Invitation from such a cause.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. Kd.2.27.4.

2.

Or, having risen up from here.

3.

Both Oldenberg, Vin.1.164, and Vinaya Texts i.336 compare this part to Kd.2.27.4Kd.2.27.8, which would mean that a monk also invited the Order collectively.