Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Portion on no offence for cutting short the rains when there is danger

Now at that time in the Kosala country monks who had entered upon the rains in a certain residence came to be molested by beasts of prey who seized them and attacked them. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “This is a case, monks, where monks who have entered upon the rains come to be molested by beasts of prey who seize them and attack them. This is indeed a danger,[1] and you should depart. There is no offence in cutting short the rains. This is a case, monks, where monks who have entered upon the rains come to be molested by creeping things which bite them and attack them. This is indeed … in cutting short the rains. Vin.1.149

Kd.3.9.2 “This is a case, monks, where monks … are molested by thieves who rob them and thrash them. This is indeed … in cutting short the rains. This is a case, monks, where monks … are molested by demons[2] who take possession of[3] them and sap their vitality.[4] This is indeed … in cutting short the rains.

Kd.3.9.3 BD.4.197 “This is a case, monks, where the village of monks who have entered upon the rains comes to be burnt by fire and the monks go short of almsfood. This is indeed a danger … in cutting short the rains. This is a case, monks, where the lodgings of monks who have entered upon the rains come to be burnt by fire and the monks go short of lodgings. This is indeed … in cutting short the rains.

Kd.3.9.4 “This is a case, monks, where the village of monks who have entered upon the rains comes to be carried away by water and the monks go short of almsfood. This is indeed … in cutting short the rains. This is a case, monks, where the lodgings of monks who have entered upon the rains come to be carried away by water and the monks go short of lodgings. This is indeed a danger, and you should depart. There is no offence in cutting short the rains.”


Kd.3.10.1 Now at that time the village of certain monks who had entered upon the rains in a certain residence was removed[5] on account of thieves. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to go to that village.” The village was split in two. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to go where there are the more (people).” The majority came to be of little faith, not believing. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to go to those who have faith and are believing.


Kd.3.11.1 Now at that time in the Kosala country monks who had entered upon the rains in a certain residence did not obtain a sufficiency, as much as they needed, of coarse or of sumptuous food. They told this matter to the Lord. He said “This is a case, monks, where monks who have entered upon the rains do not obtain a sufficiency, as much as they need, of coarse or of sumptuous food. This is indeed a danger,[6] and they should depart. There is no offence in cutting short the rains. This is a case, monks, where monks who have entered upon the rains obtain a sufficiency, as much as they BD.4.198 need, of coarse or of sumptuous food, but they do not obtain beneficial foods. This is indeed a danger … in cutting short the rains.

Kd.3.11.2 “This is a case, monks, where monks who have entered upon the rains obtain a sufficiency, as much as they need, of coarse or of sumptuous food, they obtain beneficial Vin.1.150 foods, but they do not obtain beneficial medicines. This is indeed a danger … the rains. This is a case, monks, where monks who have entered upon the rains obtain a sufficiency, as much as they need, of coarse or of sumptuous food, they obtain beneficial foods, they obtain beneficial medicines, but they do not obtain a suitable attendant. This is indeed a danger … in cutting short the rains.

Kd.3.11.3 “This is a case, monks, where a woman invites a monk who has entered upon the rains, saying: ‘Come, honoured sir, I will give you gold[7] or I will give you gold ornaments[8] or I will give you a field or I will give you a site[9] or I will give you a bull[10] or I will give you a cow or I will give you a slave or I will give you a slave woman or I will give you (my) daughter as wife or I will be your wife or I will lead another wife to you.’ If it then occurs to the monk: ‘The mind is called quickly-changing[11] by the Lord, and this may be a danger to my Brahma-faring’, he should depart. There is no offence in cutting short the rains.

Kd.3.11.4 “This is a case, monks, where a low class woman … a grown girl[12] … a eunuch invites a monk who has entered upon the rains … where relations invite … kings … thieves … men of abandoned life invite a monk who has entered upon the rains, saying: ‘Come, honoured sir, we will give you gold … or we will give you a daughter as wife or we will lead another wife to you’. If it then occurs to the monk: ‘The mind is called quickly-changing by the Lord …’ … There is no offence in cutting short the rains. This is a case, monks, where a monk who has entered upon BD.4.199 the rains sees a treasure[13] without an owner. If then it occurs to the monk: ‘The mind is called quickly changing …’ … There is no offence in cutting short the rains.

Footnotes and references:

1.

See above, BD.4.148, where this and some of the following dangers are enumerated although not in quite the same order.

2.

pisāca. Not among the “ten dangers”.

3.

āvisanti, explained at Vin-a.1070 as “they enter into the body”.

4.

ojaṃ haranti, they carry off the life-strength.

5.

vuṭṭhāsi, arose, got up; thus, went away.

6.

This is a “danger to life”, the ninth danger listed at Vin.1.113.

7.

hirañña suvaṇṇa. See BD.1.28, n.

8.

hirañña suvaṇṇa. See BD.1.28, n.

9.

vatthu. Probably meaning a site for a hut or a dwelling-place, as in Bu-Ss.6, Bu-Ss.7.

10.

gāvuṃ.

11.

lahuparivatta citta. For this sentiment, cf. SN.ii.95, Thag.4; also the expression vibbhantacitta at It.p.91; and lahucittakata, BD.4.101, above.

12.

thullakumārī; cf. above, BD.4.87, n.6.

13.

nidhi; store, hoardings, treasure at Snp.285, Dhp.76, Kp.8.2, Kp.8.9. At Ja.vi.79 explained as vākacīranivāsana, putting on a bark dress. Cf. the ruling as to picking up treasure (ratana) at Bu-Pc.84.