Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Allowance for five even when not sent for

Kd.3.6.1 Now at that time a certain monk came to be ill. He sent a messenger to monks, saying: “I, now, am ill, let monks come, I want monks to come”. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to go even if not sent for, all the more if sent for, and if the business can be done in seven days, to five (classes of people): to a monk, a nun, a probationer, a novice, a woman novice. I allow you, monks, to go to these five (classes of people) even if not sent for, all the more if sent for, and if the business can be done in seven days. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.2 “This is a case, monks, where a monk comes to be ill. If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘I, now, am ill, let monks come, I want monks to come’, you should BD.4.190 go, monks, even if not sent for, all the more if sent for, and if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will look about for a meal for the invalid, or I will look about for a meal for the one who is tending the invalid, or I will look about for medicine for the invalid, or I will ask (after) him[1], or I will tend him’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.3 “This is a case, monks, where dissatisfaction comes to have arisen in a monk. If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘Dissatisfaction has arisen in me, let monks come, I want monks to come you should go, monks, even if not sent for, all the more if sent for, and it the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will allay his dissatisfaction or get (someone) to allay it, or I will give him a talk on dhamma’.[2] The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.4 “This is a case, monks, where remorse comes to have arisen in a monk. If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘Remorse has arisen in me … I want monks to come’, you should go, monks, … if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will dispel his remorse or get (someone) to dispel it, or I will give him a talk on dhamma.’[3] The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.5 “This is a case, monks, where a wrong view comes to have arisen in a monk. If he Vin.1.143 should send … if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will dissuade him from the wrong view or get (someone) to dissuade him, or I will give him a talk on dhamma’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.6 “This is a case, monks, where a monk comes to have committed an offence against an important rule and to deserve probation.[4] If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘I have committed an offence against an important rule, I deserve probation, let monks come, I want monks to come’, you should go, monks, even if not sent for, all the more if sent for, and if the business can be done in seven days, BD.4.191 thinking: ‘I will make an effort for placing (him) on probation, or I will make a proclamation, or I will become one who completes a group’.[5] The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.7 “This is a case, monks, where a monk deserves to be sent back to the beginning.[6] If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘I deserve to be sent back to the beginning, let monks come, I want monks to come you should go monks, even if not sent for, … if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will make an effort for sending (him) back to the beginning, or I will make a proclamation, or I will become one who completes a group’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.8 “This is a case, monks, where a monk deserves mānatta (discipline)[7]. If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘I desire mānatta (discipline), let monks come, I want monks to come’, you should go, monks, even if not sent for, all the more if sent for, if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will make an effort for inflicting mānatta discipline (on him), or I will make a proclamation, or I will become one who completes a group’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.9 “This is a case, monks, where a monk deserves rehabilitation.[8] If he should send a messenger … thinking: ‘I will make an effort for (his) rehabilitation, or I will make a proclamation, or I will become one who completes a group’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.10 “This is a case, monks, where an Order becomes desirous of carrying out a (formal) act against a monk—either one of censure or one of guidance or one of banishment or one of reconciliation or one of suspension.[9] If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘The Order desires to carry out a (formal) act against me, let monks come, I want monks to come’, you should go … if the return can be made in seven days, thinking: Vin.1.144 ‘How then may the Order not BD.4.192 carry out a (formal) act or may change it to something lighter?’ The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.11 “Or a (formal) act comes to be carried out against him by the Order—either one of censure … or one of suspension. If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘The Order carried out a (formal) act against me … I want monks to come’, you should go monks, … thinking: ‘How then may he conduct himself properly, be subdued, mend his ways, (so that) the Order can revoke that (formal) act?’[10] The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.12 “This is a case, monks, where a nun comes to be ill … = Kd.3.6.2

Kd.3.6.13 … where dissatisfaction comes to have arisen in a nun … = Kd.3.6.3

Kd.3.6.14 … where remorse comes to have arisen in a nun … = Kd.3.6.4

Kd.3.6.15 … where a wrong view comes to have arisen in a nun … = Kd.3.6.5

Kd.3.6.16 … where a nun comes to have committed an offence against an important rule and to deserve mānatta (discipline).[11] If she should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘I Vin.1.145 have ommitted an offence against an important rule and deserve mānatta (discipline), let the masters come, I want the masters to come’, you should go, monks, even if not sent for, all the lore if sent for, and if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will make an effort for inflicting mānatta discipline) on her.’[12]. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.17 “This is a case, monks, where a nun deserves to be sent back to the beginning. If she should send a messenger … = Kd.3.6.7 … thinking: ‘I will make an effort for sending (her) back to the beginning’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.18 “This is a case, monks, where a nun deserves rehabilitation = Kd.3.6.9 … thinking: ‘I will make an effort for (her) rehabilitation’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.19 BD.4.193 “This is a case, monks, where an Order becomes desirous of carrying out a (formal) act against a nun, either one of censure … or one of suspension … = Kd.3.6.10 … The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.20 “Or a (formal) act comes to be carried out against her by an Order—either one of censure … or one of suspension … = Kd.3.6.11 … The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.21 “This is a case, monks, where a probationer comes to be ill … cf. Kd.3.6.2 … in seven days.

Kd.3.6.22 “This is a case, monks Vin.1.146 where dissatisfaction comes to have arisen in a probationer … where remorse comes to have arisen in a probationer … where a wrong view comes to have arisen in a probationer … where a probationer’s training comes to be interrupted.[13] If she should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘My training is interrupted, let the masters come, I want the masters to come’, you should go, monks, even if not sent for, all the more if sent for and if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will make an effort for her to undertake the training’.[14] The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.23 “This is a case, monks, where a probationer becomes desirous of being ordained.[15] If she should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘I am desirous of being ordained … I want the masters to come’, you should go, monks, … thinking: ‘Either I will make an effort for her ordination or I will make a proclamation or I will become one who completes a group’.[16] The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.24 “This is a case, monks, where a novice becomes ill … Kd.3.6.2 … The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.25 “… where dissatisfaction … where remorse … where a wrong view comes to have arisen in a novice … where a novice becomes desirous of asking about his year’s standing.[17]

BD.4.194 If he should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘I am desirous of asking about my year’s standing … I want monks to come’, you should go … thinking: ‘I will ask or I will explain’. The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.26 “… where a novice becomes desirous of being ordained … as in Kd.3.6.22 … The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.27 “This is a case, monks, where a woman novice comes to be ill … Kd.3.6.2Vin.1.147 The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.28 “… where dissatisfaction … where remorse … where a wrong view comes to have arisen in a woman novice … where a woman novice becomes desirous of asking about her year’s standing … Kd.3.6.25 … The return should be made in seven days.

Kd.3.6.29 “… where a woman novice becomes desirous of undertaking the training.[18] If she should send a messenger to monks, saying: ‘Now I am desirous of undertaking the training, let the masters come, I want the masters to come’, you should go, monks, even if not sent for, all the more if sent for, and if the business can be done in seven days, thinking: ‘I will make an effort for her to acquire the training’. The return should be made in seven days.”

Footnotes and references:

1.

pucchāmi, I think meaning to inquire after his health here (cf. “monks asking after ill ones”, BD.2.341, BD.2.399, BD.2.402), and not to “ask him (questions referring to the Dhamma)”, as at Vinaya Texts i.306, and which is more usually paripucchati.

5.

For placing him on probation, for granting or giving it, parivāsadāna.

6.

mūlāya paṭikassanāraho. Cf. Kd.1.25.21; and Vin.2.7, Vin.2.34, Vin.2.162, AN.i.99.

9.

Cf. Kd.1.25.22.

11.

Nuns did not undergo probation, parivāsa; cf. their Saṅghādisesas.

12.

The monk does not say that he will make a proclamation or become one to complete a group.

13.

kupitā, see BD.3.366.

14.

sikkhāsamādānaṃ.

15.

With the upasampadā ordination. See BD.3, Introduction, p.xlivff.

16.

Nuns’ upasampadā ordination takes place before an Order of monks.

17.

vassa. See above, BD.4.109. This must be the technical meaning of vassaṃ pucchituṃ, which editors of Vinaya Texts i.310, note say “is unknown to us”.

18.

Balancing the “to be ordained” of probationers and male novices. The woman novice had to become a probationer and spend two years in training in the six rules for probationers before she could become ordained.

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