Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Procedure for making amends for a shared offence

Kd.2.27.6 Now at that time the whole Order in a certain residence came to have fallen into a collective offence on an Observance day. Then it occurred to these monks: “It is laid down by the Lord that a collective offence should not be confessed, that a collective offence Vin.1.127 should not be acknowledged, but this whole Order has fallen into a collective offence. Now what line or conduct should be followed by us?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence the whole Order comes to have fallen into a collective offence on an Observance day. Monks, one monk should immediately be sent to a neighbouring residence by these monks, with the words: ‘Go along, your reverence, and come back having made amends for that offence, and we will make amends for the offence in your presence’.

Kd.2.27.7 “If they thus manage this, it is good. If they do not manage it, the Order should be informed by an experienced, BD.4.169 competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This whole Order has fallen into a collective offence. When it shall see another monk, a pure one, not an offender, then it shall make amends for that offence in his presence’. When he has spoken thus, the Observance may be carried out, the Pātimokkha may be heard, but no obstacle should be put in the way of the Observance from such a cause.

Kd.2.27.8 “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence the whole Order comes to be doubtful about a collective offence on an Observance day. The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This whole Order is doubtful about a collective offence. When it comes to be without doubt, then will it make amends for that offence’. When he has spoken thus, the Observance may be carried out, the Pātimokkha may be heard, but no obstacle should be put in the way of the Observance from such a cause.

Kd.2.27.9 “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence the Order, entered on the rains, has fallen into a collective offence. Monks, one monk should immediately be sent to a neighbouring residence by these monks with the words … as in Kd.2.27.6, Kd.2.27.7 … If they do not manage it, one monk should be sent away for seven days, with the words: ‘Go along, your reverence, and come back having made amends for that offence, and we will make amends for that offence in your presence’.”


Kd.2.27.10 Now at that time in a certain residence the whole Order came to have fallen into a collective offence. It did not know the name or the class[1] of that offence. A certain monk came there; he had heard much, he was one to whom the tradition had been handed down[2]; he was an expert on dhamma, an expert on discipline, an expert on the summaries; he was wise, experienced, clever; he was conscientious, scrupulous, desirous of training.[3] A certain monk approached that monk; having approached, he spoke thus to him: “What kind of an offence does he fall into, your reverence, who does such and such a thing?”

Kd.2.27.11 He spoke thus: “Whoever does such and such a thing, BD.4.170 your reverence, falls into this kind of offence. This is the kind of offence that you, your reverence, have fallen into; make amends for this offence.” He spoke thus: “I, your reverence, have not fallen into this offence altogether alone; this Vin.1.128 whole Order has fallen into this offence.” He spoke thus: “What has it to do with you, your reverence, whether another has fallen or has not fallen? Please do you, your reverence, remove[4] your own offence.”

Kd.2.27.12 Then that monk, having at that monk’s bidding made amends for that offence, approached those monks; having approached them, he spoke thus to those monks: “It is said, your reverences, that whoever does such and such a thing falls into this kind of offence. This is the kind of offence that you, your reverences, have fallen into; make amends for this offence.” But these monks did not want to make amends for that offence at that monk’s bidding. They told this matter to the lord. He said:

Kd.2.27.13 “This is a case, monks, where in a certain residence the whole Order comes to have fallen into a collective offence. It does not know the name or the class of that offence. A certain monk comes there; he has heard much … desirous of training. A certain monk approaches that monk; having approached, he speaks thus to that monk: ‘What land of offence does he fall into, your reverence, who does such and such a thing?’

Kd.2.27.14 “He speaks thus: ‘Whoever does such and such a thing, your reverence, falls into this kind of offence. This is the kind of offence that you, your reverence, have fallen into; make amends for this offence’. He speaks thus: ‘I, your reverence, have not fallen into this offence altogether alone; this whole Order has fallen into this offence’. He speaks thus: ‘What has it to do with you, your reverence, whether another has fallen or has not fallen? Please do you, your reverence, remove your own offence.’

Kd.2.27.15 “Then if that monk, having at that monk’s bidding made amends for that offence, approaches those monks and having approached them speaks thus to those monks: ‘It is said, your reverence, that whoever does such and such a thing BD.4.171 falls into this kind of offence. This is the kind of offence that you, your reverences, have fallen into; make amends for this offence’; and if, monks, these monks should make amends for that offence at that monk’s bidding, that is good. But if they should not make amends for it, then, monks, these monks need not be spoken to by that monk if he is not willing[5].”

Told is the Portion for Repeating on Codanāvatthu.

Footnotes and references:

1.

gotta.

2.

Cf. above, BD.4.157.

3.

Cf. above, BD.4.157.

4.

vuṭṭhaha.

5.

akāmā, cf. Vin.3.186 (BD.1.328). If the offending monks do not wish to make amends, the other monk need not speak to them—perhaps meaning that he need not speak to them in the words given at the end of Kd.2.27.14 above. But cf. AN.ii.113, “For this is destruction … where a Truthfinder or his fellow Brahma-farers deem that he is one who should not be spoken to”.