Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Procedure for making amends for offences

Kd.2.27.1 Now at that time a certain monk came to have fallen into BD.4.167 an offence on an Observance day. Then it occurred to this monk: “It is laid down by the Lord that the Observance should not be carried out by an offender,[1] but I have fallen into an offence. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “This is a case, monks, where a monk comes to have fallen into an offence on an Observance day. Monks, that monk, having approached one monk, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, Vin.1.126 having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to him: ‘I, your reverence, have fallen into such and such an offence, I confess[2] it’. It should be said by him[3]: ‘Do you see it?’ ‘Yes, I see it’. ‘You should be restrained in the future’.

Kd.2.27.2 “This is a case, monks, where a monk becomes doubtful of an offence on an Observance day. Monks, that monk, having approached one monk, having arranged his upper robe … having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to him: ‘I, your reverence, am doubtful as to such and such an offence. When I come to be without doubt, then will I make amends for that offence’. When he has spoken thus, the Observance may be carried out, the Pātimokkha may be heard, but no obstacle should be put in the way of the Observance from such a cause.”

Kd.2.27.3 Now at that time the group of six monks confessed[4] a collective[5] offence. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, a collective offence should not be confessed. Whoever should confess it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.” At that time the group of six monks acknowledged a collective offence. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, a collective offence should not be acknowledged. Whoever should acknowledge (such), there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Footnotes and references:

1.

See Kd.19.2.

2.

paṭidesemi.

3.

I.e. by the monk whom the offender approached.

4.

desenti.

5.

sabhāgā, shared in by them all, but whether acting together or singly is not clear. Vin-a.1064 instances eating at the wrong time or eating what has not been left over.

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