Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

The observance by an Order, etc.

Kd.2.26.1 Now at that time four monks were staying in a certain residence on an Observance day. Then it occurred to these monks: “It is laid down by the Lord that the Observance should be carried out, but we are (only) four persons.[1] Now how can the Observance be carried out by us?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to recite the Pātimokkha when there are four (of you).


Kd.2.26.2 Now at that time three monks were staying in a certain residence on an Observance day. Then it occured to these monks: “It is allowed by the Lord to recite the Pātimokkha when there are four (of us), but we are (only) three persons. Now how can the Observance be carried out by us?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to carry out the Observance by way of entire purity[2] when there are three (of you).[3]

Kd.2.26.3 “And thus, monks, should it be carried out: These monks should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, BD.4.165 saying: ‘Let the venerable ones listen to me. Today is an Observance day, the fifteenth. If it seems right to the venerable ones, let us carry out the Observance with one another by way of entire purity’. A monk who is an elder, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to these monks: ‘I, your reverences,[4] am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; I, your reverences, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; I, your reverences, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure’.

Kd.2.26.4 “A newly ordained monk, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms should speak thus to these monks: ‘I, honoured sirs,[5] am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; I, honoured sirs, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; I, honoured sirs, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure’.”


Kd.2.26.5 Now at that time two monks were staying in a certain residence on an Observance day. Then it occurred to these monks: “It is allowed by the Lord to recite the Pātimokkha when there are four (persons), to carry out the Observance by way of entire purity when there are three, but we are (only) two persons. Now how can the Observance be carried out by us?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to carry out the Observance by way of entire purity when there are two (of you).

Kd.2.26.6 “And thus, monks, should it be carried out: The monk who is an elder, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to the newly ordained monk: ‘I, your reverence, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; I, your reverence, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; Vin.1.125 I, your reverence, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure’.

Kd.2.26.7 “The newly ordained monk, having arranged his upper BD.4.166 robe over one shoulder, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to the monk who is an elder: ‘I, honoured sir, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; I, honoured sir, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure; I, honoured sir, am quite pure, understand that I am quite pure’.”


Kd.2.26.8 Now at that time one monk was staying in a certain residence on an Observance day. Then it occurred to this monk: “It is allowed by the Lord to recite the Pātimokkha when there are four (persons), to carry out the Observance by way of entire purity when there are three, to carry out the Observance by way of entire purity when there are two, but I am alone. Now how can the Observance be carried out by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Kd.2.26.9 “This is a case, monks, where one monk is staying in a certain residence on an Observance day. That monk, having swept that place to which monks return—an attendance hall or a pavilion or the root of a tree—having put out drinking water and water for washing, having made ready a seat, having made a light, should sit down. If other monks arrive, the Observance should be carried out together with them; if they do not arrive, it should be determined[6], ‘Today is an Observance day for me’. If he should not (so) determine, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Kd.2.26.10Monks, there where four monks are standing, the Pātimokkha should not be recited by three (persons), having conveyed the entire purity for one. If they should (so) recite it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. Monks, there where three monks are staying, the Observance by way of entire purity should not be carried out by two, having conveyed the entire purity for one. If they should (so) carry it out, there is an offence of wrong-doing. Monks, there where two monks are staying, it should not be determined upon by one having conveyed the entire purity for the other. If he should (so) determine, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Footnotes and references:

1.

See the scope of the powers of the “five (kinds of) Order” at Vin.1.319.

2.

pārisuddhiuposathaṃ.

3.

See next two paragraphs.

4.

āvuso. It is apparently assumed that there is one elder at least and one or two juniors, otherwise the elder would doubtless have addressed the others as bhante.

5.

bhante, because it appears to be assumed that at least one elder was present.

6.

adhiṭṭhātabbaṃ; see BD.1.128, n.3.