Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Reciting the Pātimokkha in brief, etc.

Kd.2.15.1 Then it occurred to monks: “Now, how many ways for the recital of the Pātimokkha are there?”. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, there are these five (ways for the) recital of the Pātimokkha: having recited the provenance,[1] the rest may be announced as though it had been (already) heard[2]; this is the first (way for the) recital of the Pātimokkha. Having recited the provenance, having recited the four offences involving defeat, the rest may be announced as though it had been (already) heard; this is the second (way for the) recital of the Pātimokkha. Having recited the provenance, having recited the four offences involving defeat, having recited the thirteen offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, the rest may be announced as though it had been (already) heard; this is the third (way for the) recital of the Pātimokkha. Having recited the provenance, having recited the four offences involving defeat, having recited the thirteen offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, having recited the two undetermined offences, the rest may be announced as though it had been (already) heard; this is the fourth (way for the) recital of the Pātimokkha. (Recital) in full is the fifth. Monks, these are the five (ways for the) recital of the Pātimokkha.”

Kd.2.15.2 Now, at that time, monks, thinking: “Recital of the Pātimokkha in brief is allowed by the Lord,” all the time recited the Pātimokkha in brief. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, the Pātimokkha should not be recited in brief. Whoever should (so) recite it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Kd.2.15.3 BD.4.148 Now at that time in a certain residence in the Kosala country there came to be a menace from savages[3] on an Observance day. The monks were unable to recite the Pātimokkha in full. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, if there is a danger, to recite the Pātimokkha in brief.


Kd.2.15.4 Now at that time the group of six monks, although there was no danger, recited the Pātimokkha in brief. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, if there is no danger the Pātimokkha should not be recited in brief. Whoever should (so) recite it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, if there is a danger, to recite the Pātimokkha in brief. In this connection these are dangers: a danger from kings,[4] a danger from thieves, a danger from fire, a danger from water, a danger from human beings, Vin.1.113 a danger from non-human beings, a danger from beasts of prey, a danger from creeping things, a danger to life, a danger to the Brahma-faring.[5] I allow you, monks, when there are dangers such as these, to recite the Pātimokkha in brief; in full if there is no danger.

Footnotes and references:

1.

nidāna, see above, BD.4.127.

2.

avasesaṃ sutena sāvetabbam.

3.

savara-bhaya; cf. Vin.1.168. Vin-a.1057 reads sañcarabhaya.

4.

Same list again at Vin.1.169, Vin.2.244. Cf. also Vin.1.148–Vin.1.149. See also list of seven dangers at Divyāvadāna 544.

5.

On brahmācariya, see Mrs. Rhys Davids, Wayfarer’s Words ii.533, “A Technical Term”, where she regards it as a term taken over from the brahmins who used it to denote the student-day stage in their training.

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