Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Abolishing a boundary

Kd.2.12.5 “When agreeing upon a boundary, monks, first the boundary for the same communion should be agreed upon, afterwards the (place where a monk is regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes should be agreed upon. In abolishing a boundary, monks, first the (place where a monk is regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes should be abolished, afterwards the boundary for the same communion should be abolished. And thus, monks, should the (place where the monk is regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes be abolished: The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. Whatever was agreed upon by the Order (as a place where a monk is to be regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes, if it seems right to the Order, the Order may abolish that (place where a monk is to be regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. Whatever was agreed upon by the Order (as a place where a monk is to be regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes, the Order is abolishing (that place where a monk is to be regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes. If the abolition of (the place where a monk is to be regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. That (place where a monk is to be regarded) as not away, separated from the three robes is abolished by the Order. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent; thus do I understand this’.

Kd.2.12.6 “And thus, monks, should a boundary for the same communion[1] be abolished: The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. Whatever boundary has been agreed upon by the Order for the same communion, for one Observance, if it seems right to the Order, the Order may abolish that boundary. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. Whatever boundary has been agreed BD.4.145 upon by the Order for the same communion, for one Observance, the Order is abolishing that boundary. If the abolition of that boundary for the same communion, for one Observance is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. That boundary for the same communion, for one Observance is abolished by the Order. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent; thus do I understand this’.

Footnotes and references:

1.

“For the same communion” omitted in Oldenberg’s text, but included in the Ceylon edition.