Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

The story of guidance for one on a journey, etc.

Kd.1.73.1 Now at that time a certain monk was going along a highroad in the Kosala country. Then it occurred to that monk: “It is laid down by the Lord that one should not live independently.[1] I am in need of guidance[2] but I am going along a high-road. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

I allow a monk, monks, if he is going along a high-road and is not receiving guidance to live independently.


Kd.1.73.2 Now at that time two monks were going along a high-road in the Kosala country. These arrived at a certain residence, and there one monk became ill. Then it occurred to that ill monk: “It is laid down by the Lord that one should not live independently. I am in need of guidance, but I am ill. Now BD.4.118 what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

I allow a monk, monks, if he is ill and is not receiving guidance to live independently.

Kd.1.73.3 Then it occurred to that monk who was tending the ill one: “It is laid down by the Lord … I am in need of guidance but this monk is ill. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

I allow a monk, monks, if he is tending an ill one and is not receiving guidance, to live independently although being requested.[3]


Kd.1.73.4 Now at that time a certain monk was staying in a forest and there came to be comfort[4] for him in this lodging. Then it occurred to this monk: “It is laid down by the Lord that one should not live independently. I am in need of guidance, but I am staying in a forest and there comes to be comfort for me in this lodging. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

I allow a monk, monks, if he is a forest-dweller and is thinking about abiding in comfort[5] and is not receiving guidance, to live independently, thinking: ‘If a suitable giver of guidance comes along, I will live under his guidance’.

Footnotes and references:

1.

Above, BD.4.101.

2.

ahañ c’amhi nissayakaraṇīyo.

3.

By the ill one, Vin-a.1032. That is, as the Commentary says, the ill monk may ask the other to request him to give guidance; but if through pride he does not ask, he may go away. We must therefore assume that if he stays with the invalid but does not take guidance from him, he may live independently of guidance.

4.

phāsu. Vin-a.1032, “there comes to be comfort in regard to obtaining tranquillity and vision”.

5.

Phāsuvihāra; cf. brahmavihāra, and the monk who was phāsuvihārika, below BD.4.373, Kd.7.12.1.

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