Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On the nullifications of guidance

Kd.1.36.1 Now at that time monks, when their teachers and preceptors had gone away and had left the Order and had died and had BD.4.81 gone over to another side (of the Order),[1] did not know about nullifications of guidance. They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Monks, there are these five nullifications of guidance from a preceptor: when a preceptor has gone away or left the Order or died or gone over to another side (of the Order), and command is the fifth.[2] These, monks, are the five nullifications of guidance from a preceptor. Monks, there are these six nullifications of guidance from a teacher: when a teacher has gone away or left the Order or died or gone over to another side (of the Order), and command is the fifth, or if he[3] has come to be connected with a preceptor.[4] These, monks, are the six nullifications of guidance from a teacher.

Footnotes and references:

1.

As in Kd.1.32.1.

2.

Vin-a.986 says that the teacher dismisses the pupil from guidance it the words of Kd.1.27.2.

3.

Meaning the pupil, if we follow Vin-a.988; but Dutt, Early Buddhist Monachism, p.181, takes it to mean the teacher.

4.

Vin-a.988 says that if one who shares a cell, living in dependence on a teacher, sees a preceptor walking for alms in the same village or worshipping at the same shrine, or if he hears him teaching dhamma in a dwelling-place or among houses (the teacher’s) guidance lapses. This would suggest that the preceptor occupies a higher position than the teacher.