Vinaya Pitaka (2): The Analysis of Nun’ Rules (Bhikkhuni-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 66,469 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhuni-vibhanga: the second part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a acollection of rules for Buddhist nuns. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (second part, bhikkhuni-vibhanga) contain...

Nuns’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 10

Bi-Pc.10.1.1 BD.3.261 … in Rājagaha in the Bamboo Grove at the squirrels’ feeding-place. Now at that time there was a festival on a mountain-top in Rājagaha.[1] The group of six nuns went to see the festival on the mountain-top. People … spread it about saying: “How can nuns come to see dancing and singing and music, like women householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses?” Nuns heard these people who … spread it about. Those who were modest nuns … spread it about, saying: “How can the group of six nuns go to see … music?” …

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying: “How, monks, can the group of six nuns go to see … music? It is not, monks, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … this rule of training:

Whatever nun should go to see dancing or singing or music, there is an offence of expiation.”[2]


Bi-Pc.10.2.1 Whatever means: … nun is to be understood in this case.

Dancing means: whatever is dancing.[3]

Singing means: whatever is singing.[4]

Music means: whatever is music.[5] Vin.4.268

BD.3.262 If she goes to see, there is an offence of wrong-doing. Standing where she sees or hears, there is an offence of expiation. If having left the region of sight, she sees or hears again, there is an offence of expiation. If she goes to see one or the other, there is an offence of wrong-doing. Standing where she sees or hears, there is an offence of expiation. If having left the region of sight, she sees or hears again, there is an offence of expiation.[6]


Bi-Pc.10.2.2 There is no offence if, standing in a monastery, she sees or hears; if, having come to where nuns are resting or sitting down or lying down, they dance or sing or play music; if, going along a path, she sees or hears; if, having gone as there is something to be done,[7] she sees or hears; if there are accidents; if she is mad, if she is the first wrong-doer.

The First Division: that on garlic

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. Vin.4.85 (BD.2.335 and note.)

2.

Made into a dukkaṭa for monks at Vin.2.108.

3.

Vin-a.925 says that if dancers and so on dance, or drunkards, and even peacocks, parrots and monkeys, all this is dancing.

4.

Vin-a.925 says what is connected with the utter waning of the noble ones, or the singing on festive occasions, or the singing of dhamma-repeaters if they are monks lacking in restraint, all this is singing. Cf. Vin.2.108.

5.

This may be music got by playing on a thong or the string of a lute or the music of the pitcher-drum and even of the water-drum, Vin-a.925.

7.

Vin-a.926 says that if she has gone for ticket-food, or because there is anything else to be done, there is no offence.