Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Training (Sekhiya) 55

Bu-Sk.55.1.1 BD.3.139 Now at that time the enlightened one, the lord, was staying among the Bhaggā on Suṃsumāra Hill in the Bhesakaḷā Grove in the deer-park. Now at that time the monks in the Kokanada palace[1] accepted a drinking cup, their hands (soiled) with food. People … spread it about, saying: “How can these recluses, sons of the Sakyans, accept a drinking cup, their hands (soiled) with food, like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses?” Monks heard these people who … spread it about. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can these monks accept a drinking cup, their hands (soiled) with food?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, accepted a drinking cup, your hands (soiled) with food?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, accept a drinking cup, your hands (soiled) with food? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

‘I will not accept a drinking cup, my hands (soiled) with food,’ is a training to be observed.” Vin.4.199

One should not accept a drinking cup, the hands (soiled) with food. Whoever out of disrespect accepts a drinking cup, the hands (soiled) with food, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

There is no offence if it is unintentional, if he is not thinking, if he does not know, if he is ill, if he accepts it, thinking, ‘I will wash’ or ‘I will get (someone) to wash (my hand),’ if there are accidents, if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

Footnotes and references:

1.

See Vin.2.127, MN.ii.91. Vin-a.894 says that it was lotus-shaped, padumakasaṇṭhāna; MN-a.3.321 that it was made resembling a hanging lotus, paduma. Kokanada is the red lotus, AN.iii.239.