Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 82

Bu-Pc.82.1.1 BD.3.67 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery.[1] Now at that time at Sāvatthī food with robe-material was prepared for the Order by a certain guild, saying: “Having offered food, we will present them with robe-material.” Then the group of six monks approached that guild, and having approached, they said to that guild: “Sirs, give these robes to these monks.”

“Honoured sirs, we will not give; almsfood with robes are made ready by us every year for the Order.”

“Sirs, many are the Order’s benefactors, many are the Order’s devotees. These (monks) are here depending on you, looking to you, but if you will not give to them, then Vin.4.156 who is there who will give to them? Sirs, give these robes to these monks.”

Then that guild, being pressed by the group of six monks, giving the group of six monks as much robe-material as was prepared, served the Order with a meal. Those monks who knew that robe-material with a meal[2] was prepared for the Order and did not know that it was given to the group of six monks, spoke thus:

“Sirs, dedicate robe-material to the Order.”

“Honoured sirs, there is none; the masters, the group of six monks appropriated to the masters, the group of six monks, as much robe-material as was prepared.”

Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can the group of six monks knowingly appropriate to an individual an apportioned benefit belonging to the Order?” …

BD.3.68 “Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, knowingly appropriated to an individual an apportioned benefit belonging to the Order?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, knowingly appropriate to an individual an apportioned benefit belonging to the Order? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should knowingly appropriate to an individual an apportioned benefit belonging to the Order, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.82.2.1 Whatever means: … monk is to be understood in this case.

He knows means: either he knows by himself or others tell him or (someone) tells him.

Belonging to the Order means: it comes to be given to the Order, handed over to it.

A benefit means: the requisites of robes, almsfood, lodgings, medicines for the sick, and even a lump of chunam and a toothpick and unwoven thread.

Apportioned means: if it has been expressly said: “We will give, we will make,” (and) he appropriates it to an individual, there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.82.2.2 If[3] he thinks that it is apportioned when it is apportioned (and) appropriates it to an individual, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether it is apportioned (and) appropriates it to an individual, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is not apportioned when it is apportioned (and) appropriates it to an individual, there is no offence. If he appropriates what is apportioned to the Order for another (part of the) Order or for a shrine, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he appropriates what is BD.3.69 apportioned to a shrine for another shrine or for the Order or for an individual, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he appropriates what is apportioned to an individual for another individual or for an Order or for a shrine, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is apportioned when it is not apportioned, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether it is not apportioned, Vin.4.157 there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is not apportioned when it is not apportioned, there is no offence.


Bu-Pc.82.2.3 There is no offence if he himself being asked, ‘Where do we give?’ says, ‘Give wherever your gift could be used or could be mended or should be for a long time or when for you the mind is peaceful;’ if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Twelfth

This is its key:

Regarding a rule, and disparagement,
causing confusion, striking a blow,[4]
The palm of the hand, and unfounded,
intentionally, and overhearing,
And preventing and consent,[5] and on Dabba, appropriating.

The Eighth Division: that on regarding a rule.

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. Bu-NP.30. There the offence, however, is procuring something for oneself. See BD.2.160ff. for notes.

2.

sacīvarabhatta; at Vin.3.265 cīvarabhatta.

3.

Just before this passage Bu-NP.30 has the usual directions as to forfeiture, omitted of necessity here.

4.

pahārakaṃ.

5.

paṭibāhanachandañ ca. Paṭibāhana does not occur in Bu-Pc.79 or Bu-Pc.80. But in Bu-Pc.79 it may be inferred that the group of six monks would have prevented one of their number from going to the Order, had they known that it was going to carry out a formal act against him; and in Bu-Pc.80 a monk prevented a formal act from being carried out by withholding his consent. It is necessary for the compound, paṭibāhana-chanda, to refer to two rules, in order to bring the headings in the “key” up to twelve, which is the number contained in this Division.