Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 53

Bu-Pc.53.1.1 BD.2.390 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of seventeen monks were sporting in the water of the river Aciravatī. Vin.4.112 Now at that time King Pasenadi, the Kosalan, came to be on the upper storey of the palace[1] together with Queen Mallikā. King Pasenadi, the Kosalan, saw the group of seventeen monks sporting in the water of the river Aciravati; seeing them he spoke thus to Queen Mallikā:

“Mallikā, these who are sporting in the water are men perfected.”[2]

“Undoubtedly, sire, a rule of training has not been laid down by the lord, or these monks are not conversant[3] (with it).”

Then it occurred to King Pasenadi, the Kosalan:

“Is there not some device by which I would not speak to the lord but (yet) the lord would know that these monks sported in the water?”

Then King Pasenadi, the Kosalan, having had the group of seventeen monks summoned, gave them a large sugar-ball,[4] saying:

“Honoured sirs, give this sugar-ball to the lord.”

The group of seventeen monks, taking that sugar-ball, approached the lord, and having approached they spoke thus to the lord:

“Lord, King Pasenadi, the Kosalan, gives this sugar-ball to the lord.”

“But, monks, where did the King see you?”

BD.2.391 “Sporting in the water of the river Aciravatī, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, sport in the water? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

In playing[5] in the water, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.53.2.1 Playing in the water means: if desiring, laughter he immerses (the part) above the ankle in the water, or draws it out or swims,[6] there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.53.2.2 If he thinks that it is playing when it is playing in the water, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether it is playing in the water … If he thinks that it is not playing when it is playing in the water, there is an offence of expiation. If he sports in the water with (the part) below the ankle, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he sports with a boat,[7] there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he strikes the water with the hand or with the foot or with a stick[8] or with a sherd, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he sports with water in a bowl,[9] or with sour rice-gruel or with milk or with butter-milk or with dye-stuff or with urine or with mud, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is playing when it is not playing in the water, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether it is not playing in the water, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is not playing when it is not playing in the water, there is no offence.


Bu-Pc.53.2.3 BD.2.392 There is no offence if, not desiring laughter, plunging into the water if there is something to be done, Vin.4.113 he immerses or draws out or swims; if, going to the other side,[10] he immerses or draws out or swims; if there are accidents; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Third

Footnotes and references:

1.

uparipāsādavaragalo hoti; cf. Vin.4.158, and on pāsāda, cf. above, BD.2.16, n.5.

2.

arahanto.

3.

a-ppakata-ññū. Critical Pali Dictionary gives, “not knowing what is appointed … ignorant of the main point.” Cf. Vin.4.143.

4.

guḷapiṇḍa.

5.

hāsadhamma, or, a thing of laughter. Vin-a.861 udakakīḷikā vuccati.

6.

palavati, Vin-a.861 tarati, crosses, using either his hands or feet. See Dhp.334, Thag.399.

7.

nāvāya; hauling it up on a bank or propelling it with rudder and oars, Vin-a.861.

8.

Cf. AN.i.124 = Pp.30, Pp.36.

9.

bhājanagata, cf. BD.1.77, BD.1.85, and notes.

10.

pāraṃ.

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