Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 42

Bu-Pc.42.1.1 BD.2.351 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, spoke thus to a monk, who shared (his) brother’s cell:

“Come, your reverence, we will enter the village for alms-food.” Without having had (alms-food) given to him, he dismissed him, saying: “Go away, your reverence. Neither talking nor sitting down with you comes to be a comfort for me; Vin.4.93 either talking or sitting down alone comes to be a comfort for me.”

Then that monk, when the meal-time was near, was not able to walk for alms, and returning he did not achieve participation in the meal; he became famished.[1] Then that monk, having gone to the monastery, told this matter to the monks. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can the venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, saying to a monk, ‘Come, your reverence, we will go into the village for alms-food,’ without having had (alms-food) given to him, dismiss him …?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, Upananda, saying to a monk, ‘Come …’ dismiss him? It is not, foolish man, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk, saying to a monk, ‘Come, your reverence, we will go into a village or little town[2] for alms-food,’ either causing to be given or not causing to be given (alms-food) to him, should dismiss him, saying, ‘Go away, your reverence, neither talking nor sitting down with you comes to be a comfort for me; either BD.2.352 talking or sitting down alone comes to be a comfort for me’—if doing it for just this object, not for another,[3] there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.42.2.1 Whatever means: … is monk to be understood in this case.

Monk means: another monk.

Come, your reverence, to a village or little town means: a village and a little town and a town, a village as well as little town.

Causing to be given (alms-food) to him means: causing conjey or solid food or soft food to be given.

Not causing to be given means: not causing anything to be given.

Should dismiss means: if desiring to laugh, desiring to sport together with a woman, if desiring to sit down in private, if desiring to indulge in bad habits, he speaks thus: ‘Go away, your reverence, neither talking … sitting down alone comes to be a comfort for me,’ (and) dismisses[4] him, there is an offence of wrong-doing. Dismissing him from sight[5] or from hearing is an offence of wrong-doing. When he is dismissed, there is an offence of expiation.

If doing it for just this object, not for another means: there comes to be no other object whatever (for which) to dismiss him.


Bu-Pc.42.2.2 If he thinks that he is ordained when he is ordained, (and) dismisses him, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether he is ordained … If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is ordained, (and) dismisses him, there is an offence of expiation. If he finds fault with another,[6] there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he dismisses one who is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he finds fault BD.2.353 with another,[7] there is an offence of wrong-doing. Vin.4.94 If he thinks that he is ordained when he is not ordained there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that he is not ordained when he is not ordained, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[8]


Bu-Pc.42.2.3 There is no offence if he dismisses him, saying: ‘Together we will not both keep going’[9]; if, seeing costly goods, he dismisses him, saying, ‘It will produce a state of greed’[10]; if, seeing a woman, he dismisses him, saying, ‘She will produce dissatisfaction’; if he dismisses him, saying, ‘Take back conjey or solid food or soft food for one who is ill, or for one who is left behind,[11] or for a guardian of the dwelling-place’; if, not desiring to indulge in bad habits, he dismisses him if it ought to be done; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Second

Footnotes and references:

2.

nigama; cf. above, BD.2.63, n.2.

4.

uyyojeti.

5.

dassanūpacāraṃ (literally the precincts of sight) vijahantassa; cf. below, BD.2.376.

6.

kalisāsanaṃ āropeti.

7.

kalisāsanaṃ āropeti.

8.

Most probably error for “no offence.”

9.

yāpeti, or “We will not both go together.”

10.

lobhadhamma.

11.

ohiyyaka, as e.g. on guard at a vihāra (though this notion is covered by next word); cf. Vin.3.208.